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Die Antwoord are Breaking Up Next Year. Good Riddance.

Failed performance art piece Die Antwoord will soon be no more.

Failed performance art piece Die Antwoord will soon be no more.


Ninja confirmed the group’s official September 2017 disbandment in a recent interview with Exclaim!.

"Die Antwoord dies on that day. It's all over. I feel beautiful about it. I'm not scared of the end. I'm a Ninja. I'm not scared of death," the rapper said.

They’ll presumably release their fifth and final album at that time alongside an “art project” presented by their longtime collaborator, American photographer Roger Ballen, at the Museum of Contemporary Modern Art Africa (MOCAA) in Cape Town.

They’ll release a movie too. It’s called South African Ninja. Expect it to live up to the fuckery that’s characterised Die Antwoord’s entire career.

“It's a South African gangster film that has African ninjas in it. Everything in the film is fictitious, like a regular movie, but it's hard and raw, and everything has some parallel to our lives, so it's got a surreal connection to everything," Ninja said of the film, which they’ve spent the past decade working on.

Accusations of cultural appropriation have been routinely pointed out. More recently, Ninja had the wherewithal to call this guy out for jocking his style.

So there you have it, Die Antwoord will no longer be a thing come September 2017. But given Ninja’s track record, there’s no telling which culture Waddy Jones will stake his shady ass flag on next.

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Image supplied by Candice Chirwa.

In Conversation with Candice Chirwa: 'Menstruation is More than Just Bleeding for Seven Days.'

South African activist Candice Chirwa, the 'Minister of Menstruation', speaks to us about what a period-positive world looks like, the challenges menstruators face even in 2020 and her important advocacy work with QRATE.

It's 2020, and naturally, tremendous advancements have been made across various spheres of society. From the prospect of self-driving cars and drones delivering medicines to rural areas to comparatively progressive politics and historic "firsts" for many disenfranchised groups, we've certainly come a long way. However, in the midst of all that progress, there is still one issue which continues to lag behind considerably and consistently, particularly in less developed countries: menstruation.

Candice Chirwa is a young Black woman on a mission to fiercely change the disempowering narratives and taboos that still shroud the issue of menstruation. The 24-year-old South African activist, who is endearingly known as the "Minister of Menstruation" on social media, wants young girls and women to not only accept but embrace their bodies fully in a society that insists on speaking in hushed tones about a perfectly normal biological process. Both Chirwa's research and advocacy work with the UN and her award-winning NGO, QRATE, has focused on dispelling common myths about menstruating, removing the shame and stigma around it and giving menstruators the knowledge and tools they need to navigate their world through impactful workshops.

And when Chirwa isn't collaborating with Lil-Lets, one of the biggest sanitary product brands on the continent, or co-authoring a bad-ass book titled Perils of Patriarchy, she's dominating the TEDx stage and making sure that her audience, no matter how diverse or varied, leaves the room feeling comfortable and courageous enough to boldly shout the word "vagina".

We caught up with Chirwa to discuss what initially compelled her to become a "period-positive" activist, her continued advocacy work with QRATE and what kind of world she imagines for menstruators.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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The Nigerian Army Has Denied Opening of Deadly Fire on #EndSARS Protesters

Despite considerable footage depicting #EndSARS protesters at Lekki Toll Gate having been shot at by security forces, the Nigerian military has denied that they were responsible.