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Nandy & Sauti Sol in "Kiza Kinene."

The 7 Best East African Songs of the Month

Featuring Nandy x Sauti Sol, Ethic Entertainment, Mbosso, Alikiba x Aslay, Chris Kaiga and more.

Both the new wave and the A-Listers really brought the heat this month.

Here are our favorite East African songs of September.

For more EA hits, follow our new East African Grooves playlist on Spotify and Apple Music.


Chris Kaiga 'Hizi Bundas'

"Zimenice" hitmaker Chris Kaiga returned this month with another club banger titled "Hizi Bundas." The promising newcomer has been on everyone's lips these past couple of months and with a jam like this we are sure he'll keep up the momentum.

Mbosso ft. Reekado Banks 'Shilingi'

Wasafi Records crooner Mbosso hooked up with Nigerian superstar Reekado Banks for "Shillingi", his first international collaboration. Produced by Wasafi's in-house producer Lizer Classic, the romantic bongo track is perfect for wedding receptions and anyone in the mood to celebrate love.

Ethic Entertainment 'Chapa Chapa'

Ethic Entertainment is undoubtedly Kenya's most popular act right now. The fast-rising group is spearheading a new hip hop style called "gengetone" and with their latest single "Chapa Chapa," they are asserting their dominance in the streets as well as on the charts.

Nandy feat. Sauti Sol 'Kiza Kinene'

Tanzania's pop princess Nandy dropped "Kiza Kinene" this month and she features popular Kenyan band, Sauti Sol. The romantic bongo flava track is a perfect blend of their sounds. This collaboration between these East African A-Listers is already a fan favorite.

Nviiri the Storyteller 'Overdose'

Sol Generation signee Nviiri the Storyteller is a talented singer and songwriter who is quickly becoming popular amongst Nairobi's youth. After his hit "Pombe Sigara," he follows up with another single, "Overdose," which sticks to the same theme of excess enjoyment.

Aslay x Alikiba 'Bembea'

Bongo superstars Aslay and Ali Kiba came together for "Bembea," a sultry bongo flava track for all the ladies out there.

Fik Fameica 'Wansakata' feat. Joeboy

Uganda's top rapper Fik Fameica teamed up with Nigerian singer and "Baby" hitmaker, Joeboy, for "Wansakata," a dance-ready bop that's quite easy on the ears.

For more EA hits, follow our new East African Grooves playlist on Spotify and Apple Music.


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Photo by Simon Maina /AFP for Getty Images

'Chalk Back' Sees Kenyan Women Fighting Back Against Street Sexual Harassment

Kenyan women and girls in Kibera are using chalk to literally document their experiences with sexual harassment on the very streets they've been harassed.

Kenyan women and girls living in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlements on the continent, are fed up with being sexually harassed daily on the streets by men.

In a campaign dubbed "Chalk Back", women and young girls are using chalk to document their experiences with sexual harassment on the same streets they've been harassed, according to the BBC.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Album Cover Art.

Listen to Stormzy's New Album 'Heavy is the Head'

The British-Ghanaian grime star has dropped his much-anticipated sophomore album featuring YEBBA, H.E.R., Burna Boy, Ed Sheeran, Tiana Major9 and Headie One.

British-Ghanaian rapper Stormzy has finally dropped his much-anticipated sophomore album Heavy is the Head. The album comes two years after he released his debut album Gang Signs & Prayer.

The 16-track project features the likes of American singer-songwriter YEBBA, H.E.R., Burna Boy, British singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran, Tiana Major9 and Headie One.

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Watch Zozibini Tunzi's Interview on 'Sway In The Morning'

The newly-crowned Miss Universe says that "if we start instilling leadership in young girls, then they grow up to be the leaders we need in the future."

It's been a few days since Miss South Africa Zozibini Tunzi was crowned this year's Miss Universe. While South Africans and the world are still reeling from the fact that a dark-skinned woman wearing her natural hair (in a fade, mind you) was crowned Miss Universe, Tunzi has already hit the ground running with her international press tour.

Currently in New York City, she stopped by for an interview on Sway in the Morning.

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