News Brief

Ghanaian Named British Vogue's First Black Editor in Chief

Edward Enninful, fashion and creative director, has made history as the first man of color to edit a mainstream women's fashion magazine.

Edward Enninful, fashion and creative director of W Magazine, has been named the new editor in chief of British Vogue, making him the first man and the first black editor of the publication. He will be replacing Alexandra Shulman in August of this year.


Condé Nast International chairman and chief executive Jonathan Newhouse called Enninful "an influential figure in the communities of fashion, Hollywood and music which shape the cultural zeitgeist," in the announcement, adding that "by virtue of his talent and experience, Edward is supremely prepared to assume the responsibility of British Vogue."

Hailing from Ghana, Enninful grew up in London where he was scouted as a model at 16-years-old. His career in the fashion industry accelerated shortly after, where he became the fashion director for i-D at 18—the youngest ever for an international publication. From there he's worked for Italian Vogue and American Vogue; and he's worked as a consultant for high-fashion campaigns.

In October of 2016, the British monarchy added to Enninful's accolades when they acknowledged his contribution to fashion by knighting him as Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (OBE).

Enninful was the mind behind the "grunge" days of the 90s, and led Italian Vogue's "Black Issue" back in 1998, according to The New York Times. He boldly declared his intention to end the "white out that dominates the catwalks and magazines." The issue's success led Condé Nast to print an extra 40,000 copies.

As one of the few black power players in the fashion industry, Enninful continues to be an advocate for diversity and willingly calls racism out when he sees it. He made headlines in 2013 after sharing his grievances for being assigned to sit in the second row at a Paris couture show when his white colleagues were sat in the first.

It's said that Enninful was unexpected choice for this role—let's see how he shakes British Vogue up for the better, like his future colleague Elaine Welteroth has been doing during her time over at Teen Vogue.

News Brief
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Six Things History Will Remember Kenneth Kaunda For

News of Kenneth David Kaunda's passing, at age 97, has reverberated across the globe. Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, was Zambia's first President from 1964 to 1991.

Following Nelson Mandela's passing in December 2013, Kenneth Kaunda became Africa's last standing hero. Now with his passing on Thursday, June 17 — after being admitted to the Maina Soko Military Hospital in Lusaka earlier in the week — this signals the end of Africa's liberation history chapter.

It is tempting to make saints out of the departed. The former Zambian struggle hero did many great things. He was, after all, one of the giants of the continent's struggle against colonialism. Ultimately however, he was a human being. And as with all humans, he lived a complicated and colourful life.

Here are six facts you might not have known about him.

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