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'Finding Fanon' Explores Race & Post-Colonial Identity Inside The World Of Grand Theft Auto

Larry Achiampong and David Blandy explore the post-colonial condition from inside a simulated environment in their 'Finding Fanon' trilogy.

'Finding Fanon 1', 4K Video, 2015, By Larry Achiampong and David Blandy. Photo credit: Claire Barrett


With the Finding Fanon trilogy, Larry Achiampong and David Blandy explore the post-colonial condition from inside a simulated environment. Combining art-house cinema with Machinima, the short film series follows the UK-based artists as they uncover Frantz Fanon's three lost plays as characters in Grand Theft Auto 5.

Throughout the series, Achiampong and Blandy negotiate the Martinican philosopher's ideas and set out to examine how the politics of race, racism and decolonization impact our relationships in an age of new technology, pop culture and globalization.

Achiampong tells Okayafrica that their work weaves together several stories, from how the artists’ family histories relate to colonial history to "an examination of how their relationship is formed through the virtual space, and thoughts on the implications of the post-human condition."

Watch the premiere of part two in Larry Achiampong and David Blandy's Finding Fanon trilogy below.

'Finding Fanon 2', 4K Video, 2015, By Larry Achiampong and David Blandy

'Finding Fanon 1', 4K Video, 2015, By Larry Achiampong and David Blandy. Photo credit: Claire Barrett

'Finding Fanon 1', 4K Video, 2015, By Larry Achiampong and David Blandy. Photo credit: Claire Barrett

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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