Film

'Finding Fela' Trailer & North American Theatrical Dates

The official 'Finding Fela' trailer announces the film's North American theatrical dates.


Finding Fela, the documentary from Academy Award-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney which Okayafrica/Okayplayer co-produced alongside Jigsaw Productions and Knitting Factory Entertainment, will begin its North American theatrical run in August. The news coincided with an announcement that art house distributor Kino Lorber has acquired all North American rights to the film. Today we're excited to report that the film's first official trailer has been released. Watch it below and scroll on for a list of North American theatrical dates. The Finding Fela soundtrack, which includes 17 of Fela's classic tracks plus a never-before released live version of “Colonial Mentality” recorded at the New Afrika Shine featuring Femi Kuti joining the Fela musical cast and band in a historic encore to the performance of Fela for Kalakuta, is now available for pre-order from Knitting Factory Records. Listen to a sample stream via KFR below.

Finding Fela North American Theatrical Dates

New York, NY, IFC Center (August 1-7)

Rockland, ME, Strand Theatre (August 1-5)

Denver, CO, Landmark Chez Artiste (August 8-14)

Washington, DC, Landmark E Street Cinema (August 8-14)

New York, NY, Mist (August 8-14)

Vineyard Haven, MA, Martha's Vineyard Film Society (August 8-10 & August 15-17 ONLY)

Santa Fe, NM, The Screen (August 8-14)

Berkeley, CA, Landmark Shattuck Cinemas (August 15-21)

Los Angeles, CA, Landmark Nuart Theatre (August 15-21)

San Diego, CA, Landmark Ken Cinema (August 15-21)

San Francisco, CA, Landmark Opera Plaza Cinema (August 15-21)

Atlanta, GA, Landmark Midtown Art Cinema (August 15-21)

Boston, MA, Landmark Kendall Square Cinema (August 15-21)

Philadelphia, PA, Landmark Ritz at the Bourse (August 15-21)

Nashville, TN, Belcourt Theatre (August 15-21)

Honololu, HI, Honololu Museum of Art (August 15-17, 19, & 21 ONLY)

Brunswick, ME, Frontier Cafe (August 19-24)

Houston, TX, 14 Pews (August 21 Tugg Screening)

Minneapolis, MN, Landmark Lagoon Cinema (August 22-28)

Albuquerque, NM, Guild Cinema (August 22-25)

Columbus, OH, Gateway Film Center (August 22-28)

Oklahoma City, OK, Oklahoma City Museum of Art (August 29-30)

Houston, TX, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (August 29-31)

Lambertville, NJ, Acme Screening Room (August 29-31)

Seattle, WA, Landmark Varsity Theatre (August 29 - September 4)

Portland, ME, Space Gallery (September 2)

Chicago, IL, Music Box Theatre (September 12-18)

Memphis, TN, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art (October 23)

Sign up with Tugg.com to bring Finding Fela to your city

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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