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​The First African Set to Travel Into Space has Passed Away

South African pilot, Mandla Maseko, would have been the first African to travel into space.

Mandla "Spaceboy" Maseko, a South African pilot and member of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF), competed with 1 million people back in 2014 and came out victorious as one of 23 people to win a seat on an hour-long trip to space. He would have been the first African to reach suborbital space but was tragically killed in a motorbike accident yesterday, News24 reports.


In 2013, the AXE Apollo Space Academy launched an online contest that sought to send men and women from 60 countries all over the world to travel to space on the state-of-the-art Lynx space planes. American astronaut, Buzz Aldrin, the second person to walk on the moon back in 1969 on NASA's Apollo 11 mission, even described the initiative as an "extraordinary opportunity to experience what [he'd] encountered in space".

One of Maseko's close friends, Sthembile Shabangu described him and his journey saying, "There were still rocket tests happening before they could go up. He really thought that if he went up to space he could inspire young African children that they could do anything. He used to always say that the sky was no longer the limit. She went on to add that, "He put a lot of people first and was an ambitious person with big dreams."

Africans, and more especially South Africans, are mourning the untimely death of the promising 30-year-old. Tributes continue to pour in for Maseko on social media.

Read more about Maseko's journey here.

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Photo by Jamal Nxedlana.

Afripedia is the Visual Platform Connecting African Artists to Their Clients

The newly launched platform wants to foster a strong community of African artists on the continent and in the diaspora.

Afripedia is live! The curated visual platform, which was created by Swedish production collective Stocktownfilms aims to do away with misrepresentation within the creative industry and connect African creatives to their clients by giving them increased exposure. The platform comes five years after an initial 5-part documentary series which focused on creatives in Angola, Ghana, South Africa, Kenya and Senegal.

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South Africa Makes History with its First Ever Healthcare Facility for Transgender People

The University of the Witwatersrand's Reproductive Health Institute is creating a safe space for transgender people seeking healthcare.

South Africa has made history after it opened the doors to its first dedicated healthcare facility for transgender people. According to eNCA, the Reproductive Health Institute, which has been set up by the prestigious University of the Witwatersrand, wants to create a safe space for transgender South Africans by removing the stigma and prejudice they often face while trying to access healthcare in the country. It is a major stride against the backdrop of a continent that generally still treats members of the LGBT community as second-class citizens.

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Image by Kabelenga Phiri.

Check out 'AKANTUNSE', a Visual Celebration of African Mythology

The speculative photo series by Zambian collective Kabumba, re-imagines nine significant figures in African mythology, cosmology and folklore.

Kabumba is a Zambian collective based in Lusaka that curates African visual art that seeks to push the limits on existing narratives within African art. AKANTUNSE is Kabumba's latest project—a fun and speculative photo series which celebrates nine figures in African mythology, cosmology and folklore.

We reached out to creative director, Chanda Karimamusama, who worked alongside photographer Kabelenga Phiri and make-up artist Mary Mthetwa, to find out what how AKANTUNSE came together.

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The Oscars have Disqualified 'Joy', a Film about Nigerian Sex Workers, Submitted for Best International Feature Film

Like Genevieve Nnaji's 'Lionheart', the film has reportedly been disqualified by the Academy because of too much English dialogue.

It seems films from Nigeria or films about Nigerians can't seem to catch a break at the Oscars. Just last week, Genevieve Nnaji's Lionheart was disqualified from the Best International Feature Film category of the Oscars because of too much English dialogue. The film was Nigeria's first ever entry to the Oscars—a historic moment. Similarly, Austrian filmmaker Sudabeh Mortezai's Joy, a film about Nigerian sex workers living in Vienna, has also been disqualified by the Academy in the same category, according to Deadline.

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