News Brief

Germany Tramples the Olympic Gold Hopes of Nigeria’s Football Team in the Semi-Finals Match

Nigeria’s U-23 squad is still in contention for the bronze medal and possibly a $10,000 payday for each player.

Nigeria’s football team had its Olympic hopes trampled by Germany, losing 2 to 0 in the semifinals match at Arena Corinthians in Sao Paulo.


Their loss means they still have a shot at bronze, which could translate into a $10,000 payday for each player from the squad’s Japanese patron and plastic surgeon Katsuya Takasu. Reportedly he’s enroute to Rio to personally deliver the reward plus an additional $200,000 (£153,500) “special donation.”

However even if it rains nairas, the U-23 team’s crushing loss will weigh heavy on coach Samson Siasia, who brought home silver at the Beijing games and had his sights on striking gold in Rio.

Some fans have voiced their disappointment, others have been stunned into silence:

And so the two decade-long drought continues since the last time the Nigerians became the first African team to win gold medal at the 1999 Olympics in Athens, Georgia.

Let’s take a trip down memory lane to that glorious game…

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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