Popular

Ghana's Parliament Erupted Into Laughter After Hearing Names of Villages Referencing Genitalia

Names such as "Vagina is Wise" and "Penis is a Fool" left members cackling.

Ghanaian lawmakers just couldn't keep it together on Friday, when the names of villages in the Abirem constituency in the Eastern Region of the country were read aloud during a meeting.

MP John Frimpong Osei began to list areas in his constituency that are in need of electricity, and a few of the Twi names make direct references to genitals.

BBC Africa provided some of the translations for the names:

Etwe nim Nyansa - "Vagina is Wise"
Kote ye Aboa - "Penis is a Fool"
Shua ye Morbor - "Testicles are Sad".

A video shared on social media, captures the MP's jocular reactions when Osei began to read the names of the villages lacking electricity.


Though the meeting appeared to have taken a flippant turn, Ghana's Energy Minister Boakye Agyarko went on to address the real issue at hand, stating that a survey would be conducted to determine how the villages in Abirem could be connected to the national grid—but not before offering a joke of his own about the village names: "Providing them with electricity may interfere with nocturnal activities," he quipped.

Despite some areas still lacking access, about 80 percent of Ghana's population has access to electricity—one of the highest rates on the continent. Let's hope that the hilarity that ensued will translate into serious action to provide remaining areas with full electricity.

As for the names of the villages, it's clear that they weren't intended to simply induce laughs. According to BBC's Thomas Naadi, historically, names of villages were inspired by the life experiences of the first settlers.

Audio
(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How You Can Help Nigeria’s #EndSARS Protests

We round up some ways you can support the movement and its cause, no matter where you are in the world.