#Okay100Women

ILWAD ELMAN

OkayAfrica's 100 Women celebrates African women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities.

Ilwad Elman is a social activist living in Somalia. The YALI (Young African Leaders Initiative) alum comes from a legacy of world changers. She is one of four daughters of the late Elman Ali Ahmed. Although her father is more well-known, her mother, Fartun Adan, is an ardent peace advocate as well.




In 2016, Elman was appointed by UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon as a member of the advisory group of experts on youth, peace and security. Currently, Elman is the director of programs & development for the Elman Peace and Human Rights Centre in Mogadishu—Somalia’s first initiative targeted at survivors of domestic violence. Her mother is the other founder and executive director, where women in need of shelter and support receive help. Elman also chairs the Street Children Task Force in Mogadishu.



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7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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