News Brief

‘Inxeba’ Has Been Banned From Mainstream Cinemas

Inxeba is now classified as an adult movie by the Film & Publications Board.

The Film & Publications Board of South Africa tweeted this morning that the South African movie Inxeba (The Wound) is now rated X18 "with the classifiable elements of Sex, Language, Nudity, Violence and Prejudice."


This was a decision by the FPB Appeal Tribunal, responding to an appeal based on applications lodged by CONTRALESA Gauteng and The Men and Boy Foundation.

The complaints, according to the FPB's tweets, were largely based on the perceived cultural insensitivity and distortion of the Xhosa circumcision tradition (ulwaluko), [and] strong language in the film.

The movie was previously rated 16 LS and was showing in normal cinemas since last February 2. But it now cannot be shown in mainstream cinemas, but "designated adult premises."

What's odd about this announcement however is that the FBP, in the series of tweets, didn't give any substantial reasons for this shift. "The reasons for the decision of the Appeals Tribunal are to be shared once they have been finalized and furnished by the Tribunal."

Inxeba (The Wound), however, isn't that harsh, and the sex scenes aren't as explicit.

People on Twitter aren't pleased.

This not a surprising move by the FPB, which last year tweeted questionable homophobic lies, saying, "A new symbol has been added to the LGBTQi called Pedosexual (P). It is defined as being or constituting pedosexuality, sexual activity between an adult and a child."

The tweet has since been deleted, but you know the Internet never forgets.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Ethic's Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

Former Botswana President Ian Khama has condemned Zimbabwe's government and joined solidarity with #ZimbabweanLivesMatter.