#Okay100Women

KAREN ATTIAH

OkayAfrica's 100 Women celebrates African women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities.

Nigerian-Ghanaian-American Karen Attiah is a force in the online journalism world. She's the global opinion editor at Washington Post, which is a grand title that speaks for itself—and she lives up to it. With her articulate, opinionated, thoughtful pieces, she is one of many voices that pushes the boundaries of journalism and urges us to think critically about our world—even if some commenters strongly disagree with her views and reports.




Attiah covers international and national politics, social justice, race and gender for The Post. Her work has also appeared in Salon, Huffington Post, ABC News, Voices of America and many other publications.



-AA

popular
Photo Courtesy of Uzo Aduba

100 Women: Uzo Aduba Wants to Use Her Roles to Give a Voice to the Voiceless

We talk to the Emmy-winning standout of Orange is the New Black on how to be good, just as you are.

As a child Uzoamaka Aduba was insecure about a great many things. Her name and the now-famous gap in her teeth were among the number. "My mom would try to impress upon me constantly, 'Don't you know that in Nigeria, a gap is a sign of beauty? It's a sign of intelligence.' I'm like, 'We don't live in Nigeria, mom. We live in Medfield, Massachusetts.'" Thirty-seven-year-old Aduba is quite the opposite—dramatically, if you will. Currently chatting from a mountainside village in Mendoza, Argentina, she exudes total self-possession, and is crystal clear on not just her beauty and her talent, but on what she stands for ("Equality for all. Full stop.") and even her privilege.

"Whatever I think is hard is nowhere near what hard is. First solid lesson. Anything that I considered to be difficult, I don't have to reach that far back into my history and to my community stories to know what hard really looked like," the Nigerian-American actress states in a definitive tone. "Hard is moving to a country where you know no one and have five children. Hard is surviving a civil war. Hard is surviving polio. Hard is learning how to blend into a new culture without losing your own. You understand? Me figuring out which of the seven pairs of jeans I want to wear today is not hard."

Keep reading... Show less
OkayAfrica's 100 Women

Yvonne Orji and Luvvie Ajayi Welcome OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2018 Honorees

Join two of last year's 100 Women honorees in celebrating 2018 list of trailblazing African women.

OkayAfrica has officially launched our annual 100 Women list to honor the many contributions of African women globally.

Last year's inaugural list featured a group of groundbreaking African woman who continue to shape culture and expand representation, and this year is no different.

Two of the women from our 2017 list, Nigerian actor, writer and comedian Yvonne Orji and her fellow Naija sister—writer, speaker and social critic Luvvie Ajayi—took the time out to share a special message of encouragement to the new honorees.

Keep reading... Show less
News Brief
Ethiopia's Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Abiy Ahmed Ali poses after being awarded with the Nobel Peace Prize during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony 2018 at Oslo City Town Hall on December 10, 2019 in Oslo, Norway. (Photo by Erik Valestrand/Getty Images)

Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Accepts Nobel Peace Prize Amidst Wave of Protest

The leader, who has been called a 'reformist' has been met with criticism from those who believe his efforts have not brought about tangible change.

Following the announcement of his win October, Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed formally received his Nobel Peace Prize during the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on Tuesday for his efforts to "achieve peace and international cooperation."

During his lecture, Ahmed addressed the ongoing quest for "peace," which he has been credited for fostering between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea following two decades of hostility between the two nations.

"For me, nurturing peace is like planting and growing trees," said Ahmed in his speech. "Just like trees need water and good soil to grow, peace requires unwavering commitment, infinite patience, and good will to cultivate and harvest its dividends." Ahmed was praised by chairperson of the Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, for representing a "new generation of African leaders who realise that conflict must be resolved by peaceful means."

Keep reading... Show less
News Brief

South Africans Are Angry After Load Shedding Leaves the Country in the Dark

The national power utility, Eskom, has implemented stage-6 load shedding which effectively means it has lost close to half of its generating capacity.

Since last week, South Africans have been experiencing stage 4 load shedding which saw 4000 MW being shed from the national grid in an effort to cope with shortages.

Eskom, the country's embattled state-owned power utility, has recently implemented stage-6 load shedding which is reportedly meant to end today but South Africans are not having it.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.