News Brief

Listen to Olamide's Catchy New Single 'Oil & Gas'

Olamide just gave us another track to hit the zanku to.

Following the release of the low-tempo groove "Spirit" last month, Olamide is back with a new track,"Oil & Gas."

On the song, produced by frequent collaborator Pheelz, the rapper becomes the latest to name-drop Nigerian billionaires and oil magnates mentioning wealth men like Femi Otedola and Tony Elemulu and asking them to share some of their wealth with him, because, truly, they'll never be able to spend it all on their own.


The song has the same jocular, money-oriented and tongue-in-cheek tone as last year's Killer Tunes-produced single "Poverty Die."

The simple and upbeat production on "Oil & Gas," follows Nigeria's growing zanku trend, making it an easy one to dance to.

Olamide, dropped the music video for another danceable track 'Woske' back in February. With this level of output, we're already anticipating what he'll drop next.

For now, listen to "Oil & Gas" below.

Olamide - Oil & Gas (Audio/Mp3) youtu.be

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Photo by Visual China Group via Getty Images/Visual China Group via Getty Images.

Zakes Bantwini Set to Host South Africa's First-Ever Drive-in-Concert

South African musician Zakes Bantwini wants local artists to find new ways of performing amid COVID-19 and has set his sights on hosting the country's first ever drive-in-concert.

South African artist Zakes Bantwini, real name Zakhele Madida, is on a mission to find new ways for local artists to make a living amid the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak. While the South African film and television industry has resumed with strict regulations in place, artists are still trying to figure out how to make a living outside of just online performances—some of which have not been paying gigs. As a result, Zakes Bantwini says that he's currently working on hosting the country's first-ever drive-in-concert.

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