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Lupita Nyong'o Tells Grazia UK, "Don't Touch My Hair"

The actress took to social media to call out Grazia UK for photoshopping her natural hair in the November edition.

Lupita Nyong'o called out Grazia UK on Instagram for photoshopping her natural hair on the cover and spread of the November issue.


She states:

"As I have made clear so often in the past with every fiber of my being, I embrace my natural heritage and despite having grown up thinking light skin and straight, silky hair were the standards of beauty, I now know that my dark skin and kinky, coily hair are beautiful too. Being featured on the cover of a magazine fulfills me as it is an opportunity to show other dark, kinky-haired people, and particularly our children, that they are beautiful just the way they are. I am disappointed that @graziauk invited me to be on their cover and then edited out and smoothed my hair to fit their notion of what beautiful hair looks like. Had I been consulted, I would have explained that I cannot support or condone the omission of what is my native heritage with the intention that they appreciate that there is still a very long way to go to combat the unconscious prejudice against black women's complexion, hair style and texture. #dtmh"

The magazine responded with an apology, saying they did not make such request.

This mixup calls to mind Solange's clap back to Evening Standard Magazine just last month. The magazine photoshopped her hair sculpture by artist and hairstylist Joanne Petit-Frére's off of her cover, and the singer took to Instagram to display the original look.

These apologies are necessary, yet fleeting—as the damage has already been done. While we hope these mainstream entities now know to do better in the future, these incidents are more examples of why more black people need a seat at the table.

Photo by Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

How Davido's 'FEM' Became the Unlikely #EndSARS Protest Anthem

When Nigerian youth shout the line "Why everybody come dey para, para, para, para for me" at protests, it is an act of collective rebellion and rage, giving flight to our anger against the police officers that profile young people, the bureaucracy that enables them, and a government that appears lethargic.

Some songs demand widespread attention from the first moments they unfurl themselves on the world. Such music are the type to jerk at people's reserves, wearing down defenses with an omnipresent footprint at all the places where music can be shared and enjoyed, in private or in communion; doubly so in the middle of an uncommonly hot year and the forced distancing of an aggressive pandemic that has altered the dynamics of living itself. Davido's "FEM" has never pretended to not be this sort of song. From the first day of its release, it has reveled in its existence as the type of music to escape to when the overbearing isolation of lockdown presses too heavily. An exorcism of ennui, a sing-along, or a party starter, "FEM" was made to fit whatever you wanted it to be.

However, in the weeks since its release, the song has come to serve another purpose altogether. As young Nigerians have poured out into the streets across the country to protest against the brutality of the Federal Special Anti-Robbery Squad, known as SARS, "FEM" has kept playing with the vigour of a generational protest anthem. From Lagos to Abia to Benin and Abuja, video clips have flooded the Internet of people singing word-for-word to Davido's summer jam as they engage in peaceful protests. In one video, recorded at Alausa, outside the Lagos State Government House, youths break into an impromptu rendition of the song when the governor of the state, Babajide Sanwo-Olu, tried addressing them; chants of "O boy you don dey talk too much" rent through the air, serving as proof of their dissatisfaction with his response to their demands—and the extortionist status quo.

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Trump to Remove Sudan from Terrorist List Following 330 Million Dollar Payment

President Donald Trump has announced that Sudan will be removed from the list of countries that allegedly sponsor terrorism after Sudan recently met the required payment of USD 330 million.

According to the New York Times, President Donald Trump has announced that Sudan will no longer be on America's terrorist list. This follows national orders by the United States' Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, that demanded that Sudan pay USD 330 million in compensation. The compensation is for alleged terrorist attacks on US embassies in both Tanzania and Kenya in 2008. BBC reports that Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok confirmed that the funds have been transferred and is "awaiting confirmation of receipt" from the US. The country is still reeling from over 17 years of civil wars and has been unable to engage in international trade due to having been blacklisted by the US.

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Image supplied by artist.

South African Amapiano Hit 'John Vuli Gate' Smashes Shazam Charts

South African hit song 'John Vuli Gate' by Mapara A Jazz featuring Ntosh Gazi and Colano has recorded the highest entry into Shazam's global chart following the #JohnVuliGateChallenge on social media.

Hit song "John Vuli Gate" by amapiano duo Mapara A Jazz featuring Ntosh Gazi and Colano has smashed Shazam's global charts. The song recorded the highest entry into the international chart following social media craze on TikTok and Twitter. The #JohnVuliGateChallenge is the latest dance trend that has been prompted by the infectious song.

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South African Health Minister Tests Positive for COVID-19

South African Health Minister Dr. Zweli Mkhize and has wife, Dr May Mkhize, have both tested positive for COVID-19. Dr Mkhize has encouraged South Africans to continue social distancing whilst undergoing self-isolation.