News Brief

Lupita Nyong’o is Just Like Us, Geeks Out Over Beyoncé

Watch Lupita Nyong'o talk her new movie, Queen of Katwe, and meeting Beyoncé and Jay Z on Jimmy Kimmel Live.

Superhuman Lupita Nyong’o isn’t all that different from us. Thanks to Wednesday’s episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live!, we have official confirmation that the Vogue cover star geeks out over Beyoncé, just like the rest of us Oscarless mortals.


When the topic turned to Jay Z’s famous shoutout (“I'm on my Lupita, Nyong'o”) on the Jay Electronica-featuring “We Made It” freestyle, Lupita had some delightful stories to share about the Carters.

“I felt like the coolest kid, ever,” she said of finding out about the shoutout. When Lupita did finally meet Hov at the 2015 Oscars, she assured him that he totally killed it on the name drop.

Of course, that wasn’t Lupita’s first encounter with a Carter. She goes on to tell of her Beyoncé meet cute at the 2014 Met Ball, and how a drunk friend almost botched their photo together. Luckily, B came to the rescue.

The Oscar winner also spoke about the true story behind her new movie, Queen of Katwe, in which she plays the real-life mother of real-life Ugandan chess champion Phiona Mutesi (played in the movie by newcomer Madina Nalwanga, of Lupita Instagram fame). The real-life Phiona was with them at the movie’s world premiere this month at the Toronto International Film Festival, and according to Lupita, it was Phiona’s first time watching a movie in a movie theater.

As for the first movie Lupita ever saw? Something with Steven Seagal, she bets.

Watch the full interview below. Queen of Katwe opens in select theaters on Friday and everywhere else on September 30.

Literally laughing out loud with @jimmykimmel. See why tonight on @jimmykimmellive! #QueenOfKatwe

A photo posted by Lupita Nyong'o (@lupitanyongo) on

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(Photo by Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images)

Chinonye Chukwu Will Direct the First Two Episodes of HBO Max's Upcoming 'Americanah' Series

Here's the latest news surrounding the highly-anticipated limited series, starring Lupita Nyong'o, Uzo Aduba and more.

Nigerian-American director Chinonye Chukwu is set to helm the first two episodes of the upcoming limited series Americanah, starring Lupita Nyong'o.

Chukwu is the award-winning filmmaker, behind the critically-acclaimed film Clemency, which won the 2019 Sundance Grand Jury Prize, making her the first Black woman to win the award.

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Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Glamour

Watch Trevor Noah Talk About the Lack of Diversity in the 2020 Oscar Nominations

In a segment of 'The Daily Show', the South African comedian shares his views about the glaringly White and male nominations for this year's Oscars.

Following the release of the Oscar nominations recently, there's been widespread outrage with the glaring lack of diversity among this year's nominees.

Recently, South African comedian and host of the The Daily Show, Trevor Noah, gave his views on the matter. As always, he held nothing back.

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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