Audio

Listen To Three Unreleased Tracks From Damon Albarn's 'Maison des Jeunes' Project

Transgressive Records shares three bonus tracks from the 2013 album 'Maison des Jeunes.'


Nearing its one-year anniversary, Maison des Jeunes — the multi-toned album that stemmed from Damon Abarn's Africa Express project and joined Western musical luminaries like Brian Eno, Nick Zinner, and Ghostpoet with burgeoning Malian talents such as Songhoy BluesAdama Koita, Bijou, and Gambari — has let go of three exclusive bonus tracks from the record. "Malioria," "Loop" (Mali Guitare)," and "N taara," each different in mood & style, add to the varied sonic richness of the album"N taara," produced by London-based Two Inch Punchhas a playful nature with a through-line of light drums that sounds like children at play. Despite a few downcast electronic effects, those drums and a chorus of soft voices make it the kind of song that's infectiously joyful upon first listen and deeply felt upon subsequent ones. The Lil Silva-produced "Maliora" is dark at its core with an atmospheric trip-hop beat thudding throughout. And "Loop (Mali Guitare)," produced by Gorillaz lead guitarist Jeff Wootton, features some intensely fast guitar-work. Similar to "Tennessee Hotel" from Albarn's 2002 album Mali Music, "Loop (Mali Guitare)" is the type of guitar-driven song that transcends its acoustic body. Taken together, these three bonus tracks from Maison des Jeunes are a capsule of the album as a whole, displaying the larger work's achievement of refreshing originality and moving intensity. Listen on below via Transgressive Records.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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