Audio

Cape Town Beatmaker Maramza's Futuristic Rework Of Card On Spokes

Cape Town beatmaker Maramza contributes to Card On Spokes' 'Lead Me To The Water Remixes EP' with a futuristic rework of 'Rain.'


Cape Town beatmaker Maramaza (aka Richard Rumney aka Richard The Third) contributes to Card On Spokes' recent Lead Me To The Water remix project with a futuristic rework of “Rain.” Switching between moments of chaotic synths and ethereal electronic trills, Maramza breaks down flooding eardrums and New York-based singer (by way of Cape Town and London) Nicky Schrire's eerie vocals with waves of galactic soundscapes. His latest cut is one of five tracks on the Lead Me To The Water REMIXES EP, which also features remixes from SA/UK's Jumping Back Slash, hazy-bassmaker Fever Trails, and Dank. Listen to the EP in full below and grab a free download here.

>>>STREAM CARD ON SPOKES' 3-TRACK LEAD ME TO THE WATER EP HERE

Film

Coming 2 America: New Yorkers in Zamunda

Coming 2 America: If one can sit through cringey "African accents" and take the elephants as hyperbole, they could score some laughs for nostalgia's sake.

Coming to America, originally released in 1988, is a cringeworthy watch in 2021. The cult classic opens with the song "Imbube" performed by Ladysmith Black Mambazo and shows the royal family of Zamunda living alongside elephants and zebras. Throughout the film, Africans are portrayed as savages who don't understand basketball, marvel at discarded glass and can't use mop buckets.

With its recently released sequel, Coming 2 America, which comes 32 years later, the film's original writers and director Craig Bowler had an opportunity to place the franchise on the right side of history. They try, but, for the most part, they fail.

Whereas Coming to America followed Africans as they navigate The Big Apple, in Coming 2 America, it's Americans who find themselves in Zamunda. They are the outliers whose slang, mannerisms and casual dress deem them the savages in a royal house of great mannerisms and dignified language.

Now the new king of Zamunda after the death of his father King Jaffe Joffer, still played by James Earl Jones, Akeem (reprised by Eddie Murphy 32 years later) finds himself in many similar situations that his father also faced in the original film. He gets to navigate outdated traditions he struggled against in his youth. Much like King Jaffe did when he used his power to allow his son to marry Lisa McDowell (still played by Shari Headley from the original movie) more than 30 years ago, Akeem has to exercise discretion while adjusting the royal rules that aren't aligned with the modern world.

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