News Brief

South Africans Remember the Tragic Marikana Massacre at Lonmin Mine

Seven years ago today, 34 miners were gunned down by police and justice is still not yet on the horizon.

Today is the seventh year anniversary of the Marikana Massacre which took place at Lonmin Mine. Situated in South Africa's North West province, workers at the mine downed their tools and embarked on protests where they demanded that their salaries be increased. In the week leading up to the tragic day of August 16th, there were numerous attempts by trade unions such as the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU) to bring an end to the clashes between the mineworkers and the police. Their attempts were in vain. Thirty-four miners were gunned down by police and several others injured in what was the worst loss of human life at the hands of the police since the Apartheid era.


There are a number of reasons why the Marikana Massacre has remained a wound in the hearts of many South Africans. Internationally-acclaimed South African filmmaker, Rehad Desai, produced the poignant and Emmy award-winning documentary, Miners Shot Down, two years after the massacre and the details revealed within the documentary were telling.

There was tremendous suspicion that the police had attempted to conceal the true events of that day. What's worse, there was actual footage that went against what the then National Police Commissioner, Riah Phiyega, had reported. As Desai's documentary pointed out, it was unclear why the protesting miners, who were stationed on a large boulder and were not occupying any mine property or blocking any roads, were gunned down in the first place. The documentary also revealed that on the day, the police had ordered 4000 rounds of live ammunition and four vans from the mortuary. In addition, following the massacre, ambulances were reportedly barred access to any of the miners for an hour.

If that were not enough, President Cyril Ramaphosa, sat on the non-executive board of Lonmin Mine and allegedly sent damning emails the day before the massacre.

Although evidence pointing towards the crime scene having been tampered with and miners in hiding having been sought out and murdered, justice has still not been delivered for many of the families affected.

The Marikana Massacre remains to this day, one the darkest times in South Africa's fledgling democracy.

Watch the trailer to Miners Shot Down below.

Miners Shot Down - Cinema Trailer youtu.be

Music
Photo courtesy of AYLØ.

Interview: AYLØ Bridges His Music & Universe In the 'Clairsentience' EP

The Nigerian artist talks about trusting your gut feelings, remedying imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do.

AYLØ's evolution as an artist has led him to view sensitivity as a gift. As the alté soundscape in the Nigerian scene gains significant traction, his laser focus cuts through the tempting smokescreen of commercial success. AYLØ doesn't make music out of need or habit. It all boils down to the power of feeling. "I know how I can inspire people when I make music, and how music inspires me. Now it's more about the message."

Clairsentience, the title of the Nigerian artist's latest EP, is simply defined as the ability to perceive things clearly. A clairsentient person perceives the world through their emotions. Contrary to popular belief, clairsentience isn't a paranormal sixth sense reserved for the chosen few, our inner child reveals that it's an innate faculty that lives within us before the world told us who to be.

Born in 1994 in Benin City, Nigeria, AYLØ knew he wanted to be a musician since he was six-years-old. Raised against the colorful backdrop of his dad's jazz records and the echoes of church choirs from his mother's vast gospel collections, making music isn't something anyone pushed him towards, it organically came to be. By revisiting his past to reconcile his promising future, he shares that, "Music is about your experiences. You have to live to write shit. Everything adds up to the music."

Our conversation emphasized the importance of trusting your gut feelings, how to remedy imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do,

This interview has been edited for purposes of brevity and clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Bobi Wine and His Wife Released from House Arrest

Ugandan politician Bobi Wine and his wife Barbara Itungo Kyagulanyi have been released from a near two-week military house arrest following a recent ruling from a Ugandan court.