News Brief

R20 Million Rand Statues to be Erected in Durban to Encourage 'Black Unity'

The pricey statues are of the late Apartheid struggle veterans Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo.

The local eThekwini Municipality in the city of Durban is set to erect bronze statues of the late Nelson Mandela and Oliver Tambo on one of the city's major highways. The statues are the work of artist Lungelo Gumede and will be placed alongside the statues of current president Cyril Ramaphosa and former president Jacob Zuma.


South Africans have expressed considerable criticism after the news of eThekwini Municipality having struck a "two for the price of R20 million (approximately $1.4 million)" deal with Gumede for his bronze statues of the two late Apartheid struggle veterans. The statues are going to be placed along Durban's M4 highway.


The municipality has already begun to receive backlash for what can only be termed political buffoonery on their part. In an interview with the eNCA below, the head of parks and recreation Thembinkosi Ngcobo speaks of how the municipality views the acquisition of the statues as being essential to political identity as well as black unity.


R20 million for two statues youtu.be

Ngcobo goes on to say that:

"The triumph we had over the apartheid system also forced us to be together, and because of that we gained our identity and in politics, there is nothing more important in my view than the politics of identity. Whoever will oppose this is someone who is going to be benefiting if black people were to be less united than they are now, because obviously for them they will have some benefits out of those divisions."

Owing to the scourge of Apartheid, the country has rightly set about a transformation and decolonization project which sees the reclaiming of spaces that intentionally excluded Black South Africans. This project has included the renaming of roads after struggle veterans, the renaming of universities and spaces within them, the removal of symbols of colonial oppression such as the Cecil John Rhodes statue at the University of Cape Town and yes, the erection of statues of the many heroes of Black South Africans.

South Africans on Twitter expressed how they feel about the steep price of the two statues.





News Brief
Photo by Phill Magakoe / AFP) (Photo by PHILL MAGAKOE/AFP via Getty Images.

South African Government Sends Envoy to Zimbabwe Amid Unrest

President Cyril Ramaphosa recently sent an envoy to meet with Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa amid the widespread arrests of journalists, opposition leaders and protesting citizens.

EWN reports that South African President Cyril Ramaphosa recently sent an envoy, consisting of Sydney Mufamadi, Baleka Mbete and several others, to speak with Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa amid mass arrests of journalists, opposition leaders and protesting citizens in the country. While the Zanu-PF led government denies there is an ongoing crisis, there continues to be public outcry from Zimbabweans who are demanding socio-political and economic changes under the online banner of #ZimbabweanLivesMatter.

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Image collage by Evanka Williamson.

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Thanks to Beyoncé, Solomon Linda's famous song finally made its Disney debut—81 years after it was written.

By now, we've all seen and heard think piece after think piece about Beyoncé's latest visual album release Black Is King. The film depicts and celebrates a great deal of African culture and history, paying homage to many underrated and misunderstood artists and practices.

One moment, however, put an end to an 81-year struggle with the Disney giants.

Perhaps one of Disney's most popular songs, "The Lion Sleeps Tonight," is a reproduced version of the late South African performer Solomon Ntsele (Linda)'s song "Mbube."

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Image via the artist's IG.

Interview: Prettyboy D-O Wants the 'Whole World to Believe In Themselves’ Through His Music

Prettyboy D-O is a singular presence in Nigeria's growing alté movement. We speak to him about his latest project, his cult-like following and what motivates his sound.

Every other year, there is a breakout star raised by the streets, who greatly influences the Afrobeats sound within that time frame. "Street music" is what usually dominates the clubs, determines the mainstream soundscape and inspires viral dance routines that spread across Africa and sometimes globally. The sound embodies the madhouse that is Lagos—the acme of Nigeria's music industry. Towards the end of the last decade, a new genre of music weaved its way into prominence in Nigeria. It was tagged alté, a derivative of the word alternative. Between the intersection of street music and alté music is where you find Prettyboy D-O. The artist, born Donald Ofik, is a genre of his own which he calls "culté" a contraction of cult and alté, Prettyboy D-O's message is loud and clear: winning against all odds while spreading love in his own way.

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Burna Boy's New Album 'Twice As Tall' Is Coming This Week

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