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Photos: Namsa Leuba's 'Ya Kala Ben'


Ya Kala Ben is the newest series by photographer Namsa Leuba. Raised by a Helevetian father and Guinean mother, Namsa was exposed to two different cultures from a young age. Her photography work focuses on an African's identity through the Western lens. For her most recent series, recently featured on Another Africa, she researched the cultural practices and rituals from the region of Conakry, Guinea in West Africa. The photographs prove to be aesthetically pleasing whilst maintaining the richness of culture for the viewer to appreciate.

[H/T Another Africa]

 

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Photo courtesy of the artist.

Falle Nioke Does Not Disappoint With New Single ‘Salia’

The Guinean singer has a new single and a short documentary about a new life chapter.

Falle Nioke is a singer and multi-instrumentalist from Conakry, Guinea who you need to get to know. Nioke has just released a new single produced by Johan Hugo of The Very Best. "Salia," has pumping, pulsating beats. His voice is bold and rings clear, alternating between pure sound and slightly effected vocals–doubling them to make it sound like a ghost-version of himself is trailing close behind.

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Photos
From 'Weke' by Namsa Leuba.

This Stunning Photo Series Captures the Mystery and Beauty of Benin’s Voodoo Tradition

Swiss-Guinean photographer Namsa Leuba's new photo series challenges how the western gaze views African traditional religions.

Weke, a new photographic series by Swiss-Guinean art director and photographer Namsa Leuba, offers an intimate view into the voodoo religion and animist practices of the Republic of Benin. Leuba's portrayal results in "images based on contents of the local context which take a new form of life, rooted in artistic aesthetics and fantasy."

The artist lived in Benin, the birthplace of voodoo, for two-and-a-half months, participating in different ceremonies and rituals with voodoo priests for research into the religion. She portrays a concept of voodoo which "cannot be depicted visually," according to her artist statement. Leuba tells OkayAfrica she attempted to make the invisible to make it visible: "I show a fiction vision, different unreal and surrealist scenes with poetry and delicacy."

The title 'Weke' translates to "the visible and invisible universe, all things created, living, breathing or not" in Benin local language. Leuba's camera is also transformative in producing striking digital photography derived from ritual practice and ancient spiritual customs.

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Ethiopia's Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Abiy Ahmed Ali poses after being awarded with the Nobel Peace Prize during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony 2018 at Oslo City Town Hall on December 10, 2019 in Oslo, Norway. (Photo by Erik Valestrand/Getty Images)

Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Accepts Nobel Peace Prize Amidst Wave of Protest

The leader, who has been called a 'reformist' has been met with criticism from those who believe his efforts have not brought about tangible change.

Following the announcement of his win October, Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed formally received his Nobel Peace Prize during the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on Tuesday for his efforts to "achieve peace and international cooperation."

During his lecture, Ahmed addressed the ongoing quest for "peace," which he has been credited for fostering between Ethiopia and neighboring Eritrea following two decades of hostility between the two nations.

"For me, nurturing peace is like planting and growing trees," said Ahmed in his speech. "Just like trees need water and good soil to grow, peace requires unwavering commitment, infinite patience, and good will to cultivate and harvest its dividends." Ahmed was praised by chairperson of the Nobel Committee, Berit Reiss-Andersen, for representing a "new generation of African leaders who realise that conflict must be resolved by peaceful means."

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South Africans Are Angry After Load Shedding Leaves the Country in the Dark

The national power utility, Eskom, has implemented stage-6 load shedding which effectively means it has lost close to half of its generating capacity.

Since last week, South Africans have been experiencing stage 4 load shedding which saw 4000 MW being shed from the national grid in an effort to cope with shortages.

Eskom, the country's embattled state-owned power utility, has recently implemented stage-6 load shedding which is reportedly meant to end today but South Africans are not having it.

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