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Osei Bonsu has Been Named the International Art Curator for London's Tate Modern

The British-Ghanaian curator will oversee the African arm of the museum's modern and contemporary art.

Yesterday, Osei Bonsu, was named the international art curator for the African arm of Tate Modern in London. The British-Ghanaian art curator, critic and historian, joins Nabila Abdel Nabi and Devika Singh will respectively oversee the Middle Eastern and Asian arms of modern and contemporary art respectively while Valentina Ravaglia will be in charge of Tate Modern's display programs. The appointment of these talented and diverse individuals is a part of the museum's intentions of steering in a more international direction.


Speaking about the recent appointments, Tate Modern's director, Frances Morris, said that, "Their significant experience and expertise will play an important part in expanding our knowledge of modern and contemporary art from Africa, South Asia, and the Middle East, furthering our ambition to present a truly international story of art through our program and collection."

Bonsu is a lecturer of modern and contemporary art as well as the chairperson of the 2019 African Art in Venice Forum. Back in 2015, he wrote Saatchi Gallery's catalog, Pangaea II: New Art from Africa and Latin America, which brought together the works of 18 South American and African artists. Bonsu described the exhibition saying that it "accesses a personal universe that has nothing to do with geography and much more to do with imagination." In 2017, Bonsu went on to curate the 10th edition of Satellites, an exhibition which is co-commissioned by Jeu de Paume and the Center for Contemporary Art in Bordeaux. There, he organized an exhibition entitled The Economy of Living Things with several other artists. You can view that work in the video below.

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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Interview: 808x On Crafting Different Sounds For the Diverse Innanetwav Roster

808x, the in-house producer for South Africa's popular hip-hop collective/label Innanetwav, breaks down his working process with artists and the importance of energy.