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Petite Noir Explores The Perception Of Africa As A 'Dark Continent' In The Video For 'Best'

Petite Noir shares the striking visuals for "Best," the second single off his upcoming album 'La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful'


Petite Noir is sharing his latest music video for "Best," the second single off his upcoming La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful full-length on Domino Records. The striking Travys Owen-directed visuals explore the Congolese-Angolan artist's concept of 'noirwave,' examining the perception of Africa as a "dark continent," exploring its split identity as a both beautiful and unforgiving place, and showcasing a new, forward-thinking African aesthetic influenced by the likes of Fela Kuti, Tabu Ley Rochereau and Yasiin Bey. "It's just the story their music tells and the sense of freedom," adds Petite Noir, "It's about seeing the positive in dark times."

"We wanted to make 4 distinct ‘tribes’ of people," explains director Travys Owen. "This allowed us to create the visual journey that Yannick is on, running through all of these different landscapes, and allowed us to create these rich scenes which were very different from each other. The four main elements in the video are Fire, Malachite (earth/rock), Water and Gold. The video is about Yannick’s journey through all of these landscapes meeting all of these different tribes."

La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful, a follow-up to last year’s The King Of Anxiety EP, is available now for pre-order and will be out September 11. Watch Petite Noir's video for "Best," featuring art direction from Rochelle Nembhard, below and see his upcoming US and European tour dates listed underneath.

Petite Noir Tour Dates

Sun August 23 || Brooklyn, New York || AfroPunk Festival

Tues September 15 || London, UK || Lexington

Wed September 16 || Glasgow, UK || Stereo

Thu September 17 || Manchester, UK || Deaf Institute

Sat September 19 || Nurnburg, Festival, Germany || Melt!

Mon September 21 || Paris, France || Badaboum

Tues September 22 || Brussels, Belgium || Botanique/Witloofbar

Thu September 24 || Amsterdam, Netherlands || Melkweg

Fri September 25 || Hamburg, Festival, Germany || Reeperbahn Festival

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Photo by NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A Year After #EndSARS, Nigerian Youth Maintain That Nothing Has Changed

Despite the disbandment of the SARS units, young Nigerians are still being treated as criminals. We talk to several of them about their experiences since the #EndSARS protests.

On September 12th, Tobe, a 22-year-old student at the University of Nigeria's Enugu Campus was on his way to Shoprite to hang out with his friends when the tricycle he had boarded was stopped by policemen. At first, Tobe thought they were about to check the driver's documents, but he was wrong. "An officer told me to come down, he started searching me like I was a criminal and told me to pull down my trousers, I was so scared that my mind was racing in different ways, I wasn't wearing anything flashy nor did I have an iPhone or dreads — things they would use to describe me as a yahoo boy," he says.

They couldn't find anything on him and when he tried to defend himself, claiming he had rights, one of the police officers slapped him. "I fell to the ground sobbing but they dragged me by the waist and took me to their van where they collected everything including my phone and the 8,000 Naira I was with."

Luckily for Tobe, they let him go free after 2 hours. "They set me free because they caught another pack of boys who were in a Venza car, but they didn't give me my money completely, they gave me 2,000 Naira for my transport," he says.

It's no news that thousands of Nigerian youth have witnessed incidents like Tobe's — many more worse than his. It's this helpless and seemingly unsolvable situation which prompted the #EndSARS protests. Sparked after a viral video of a man who was shot just because he was driving an SUV and was mistaken as a yahoo boy, the #EndSARS protests saw millions of young Nigerians across several states of the country come out of their homes and march against a system has killed unfathomable numbers of people for invalid or plain stupid reasons. The protests started on October 6th, 2020 and came to a seize after a tragedy struck on October 20th of the same year.

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