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Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

This Stunning Photo Series Re-imagines What Cities Could Look Like in the Future

As Accra undergoes massive urbanization, buildings 'in limbo' are providing an alternative space for creatives and the youth.

Unfinished buildings are commonplace in Accra, Ghana, a city whose landscape is changing every single day. High-rise structures and concrete worlds are overtaking traditional neighborhoods and leaving urban spaces in a state of "limbo"⁠—the future of the city fossilized within the fragments of its past. One of these many unfinished buildings is an estate in the neighborhood of East Legon, and is now the site of a provocative art exhibition, the first of many that will be showcased in unfinished properties across Accra.


Dominique Petit-Frère and Emil Grip are the co-founders of LIMBO ACCRA, an art platform that is dedicated to re-imagining public spaces in Accra. The maiden exhibition, an art installation within an incomplete estate in East Legon, contains several rooms which have each been uniquely set up through the different perspectives of local artists, designers and cultural critics. Petit-Frère worked with the likes of Serge Attukwei Clottey, David Alabo, Patrick Tagoe-Turkson and Adjoa Armah, among other local talent.

Speaking about her recent exhibition, Petit-Frére says that she wanted it to encourage creatives and the youth in Accra to imagine what future cities can look like. She says, "We see the changes everyday, luxury shopping malls and concrete apartment blocks replacing older, more traditional neighborhoods throughout Accra. Yet many of us do not often stop and ask ourselves what this means and what we are losing in the process of modernization." Petit-Frère asks even more pointedly, "What happens when we do not have the power to create our own spaces through our own aesthetics? What happens when our city does not belong to us?"

Describing what her ultimate hope is for various spaces "in limbo", Petit-Frère says that, "We often find ourselves playing with this imagination of driving through the city of Accra and seeing a sparse set of uncompleted concrete structures occupied by dense botanica and activated through a series of creative-cultural programming. She adds that, "We want to change the narrative from being unused/unwanted sites to hubs for innovation and coexistence."

View the stunning photo series below:

Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

Image by Anthony Comber.

Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

Image by Anthony Comber.

Image by Emil Grip.

Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

Image by Anthony Comber.

Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

Image by Ofoe Amegavie.

News Brief
Photo by -/AFP via Getty Images

Sudan Declares State of Emergency, As Military Dissolves Transitional Government

As the North African country edged closer to democracy, Sudan's military has seized power.

Sudan's military has seized power over the North African country, arresting multiple civilian leaders, including the current Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok. The power-sharing, unstable coalition, called the Sovereign Council, was created as a transitional government after the fall of dictator Omar al-Bashir in 2019, in an attempt to move towards a democratic Sudan.

The Sudanese public has been split in recent weeks as groups protested for a military-run state, while others pushed for a civilian lead, democratic nation. Last week, the Prime Minister vocalized his plans towards a full transition to civilian rule, and his plans to have that body in place by November 17, echoing the voices of thousands of Sudanese demonstrators who showed up in hoards to demand that the promise of Sudan's pro-democracy movement be honored. But on Monday the PM and multiple government ministers and officials were placed under arrest, resulting in Sudan's top general's declaring State of Emergency.

General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan said in a televised statement, "To rectify the revolution's course, we have decided to declare a state of emergency nationwide… dissolve the transitional sovereign council, and dissolve the cabinet." His statement came as soldiers fired live rounds at anti-military protestors, outside of the army headquarters in the capital.

Internet services were cut across the country around dawn and the main roads and bridges into Khartoum shut, before soldiers stormed the headquarters of Sudan's state broadcaster in the capital's twin city of Omdurman, the ministry said. After months of rising tensions in the country, army and paramilitary troops have been deployed across the capital city, Khartoum, with the airports and internet access being shut down. As a result of the coup, hundreds of protestors have taken to the streets, demanding the return of a civilian ruled and the transitional government, the BBC reports.

Demonstrators have spread to a number of Sudanese cities including Atbara, Wad Madani, and Port Sudan, and more are expected to attend the call for action. "We will not leave the streets until the civilian government is back and the transition is back," protest attendee Sawsan Bashir told AFP. While demonstrator Haitham Mohamed says, "We are ready to give our lives for the democratic transition in Sudan."


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