Events
Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photos: Here's What Went Down at the Labor Day Edition of Everyday Afrique

The diaspora showed out for the last Everyday Afrique party of the year.

Everyday People, OkayAfrica and Electrafrique, teamed up one again this past Labor Day for an Everyday Afrique party like no other.

The action took place at The Well in Brooklyn, where some of the city's best dressed came through to party to tunes from the likes of DJ Moma, DJ Tunez, DJ Cortega, Rich Knight, Boston Chery and DJ Buka, who all kept the energy on high throughout the day.

During the festivities, Afrodance NYC performed a special tribute to the late DJ Arafat during DJ Cortega's set, while Boston Chery delivered a standout set that was a tribute to Haiti. There was an epic zanku circle, led by Young Prince and Frankie B Cool delivered on the djembe. None other than DJ Tunez, closed out the night with a standout set that included a run of several of his own hits.

It was a day to remember, but if you weren't there for the action, don't fret. Check out what went down at the Labor Day edition of Everyday Afrique via the photo recap below with images from Kadeem Johnson and Elliott Ashby.


Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby


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