Events
Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photos: Here's What Went Down at the Labor Day Edition of Everyday Afrique

The diaspora showed out for the last Everyday Afrique party of the year.

Everyday People, OkayAfrica and Electrafrique, teamed up one again this past Labor Day for an Everyday Afrique party like no other.

The action took place at The Well in Brooklyn, where some of the city's best dressed came through to party to tunes from the likes of DJ Moma, DJ Tunez, DJ Cortega, Rich Knight, Boston Chery and DJ Buka, who all kept the energy on high throughout the day.

During the festivities, Afrodance NYC performed a special tribute to the late DJ Arafat during DJ Cortega's set, while Boston Chery delivered a standout set that was a tribute to Haiti. There was an epic zanku circle, led by Young Prince and Frankie B Cool delivered on the djembe. None other than DJ Tunez, closed out the night with a standout set that included a run of several of his own hits.

It was a day to remember, but if you weren't there for the action, don't fret. Check out what went down at the Labor Day edition of Everyday Afrique via the photo recap below with images from Kadeem Johnson and Elliott Ashby.


Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Kadeem Johnson

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby

Photo by Elliott Ashby


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14 Cultural Events You Can't Miss this December in South Africa

OkayAfrica's guide to must-see events during South Africa's festive season.

South Africans will tell you that December is not just a month, it's an entire lifestyle. From beginning to end, it's about being immersed in a ton of activity with friends and family as well as any new folk you meet along the way. Whether you're looking to turn up to some good music or watch some provocative theater, our guide to just 14 cultural events happening in South Africa this December, has something for everyone.

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Art
Image courtesy of Trap Bob.

Trap Bob Is the 'Proud Habesha' Illustrator Creating Colorful Campaigns for the Digital Age

The DMV-based artist speaks with OkayAfrica about the themes in her work, collaborating with major brands, and how her Ethiopian heritage informs her work.

DMV-based visual artist Tenbeete Solomon also known as Trap Bob is a buzzing illustrator using her knack for colorful animation to convey both the "humor and struggle of everyday life."

The artist, who is also the Creative Director of the creative agency GIRLAAA has been the visual force behind several major online movements. Her works have appeared in campaigns for Giphy, Girls Who Code, Missy Elliott, Elizabeth Warren, Apple, Refinery 29 and Pabst Blue Ribbon (her design was one of the winners of the beer company's annual art can contest and is currently being displayed on millions of cans nationwide). With each striking illustration, the artist brings her skillful use of color and storytelling to the forefront.

Her catalog also includes fun, exuberant graphics that depict celebrities and important moments in Black popular culture. Her "Girls In Power" pays homage to iconic women of color in a range of industries with illustrated portraits. It includes festive portraits of Beyoncé, Oprah, Serena Williams and Michelle Obama to name a few.

Trap Bob is currently embarking on an art tour throughout December, which sees her unveiling murals and recent works for Pabst Blue Ribbon in her hometown of DC and during Art Basel in Miami. You can see her tour dates here.

We caught up with the illustrator via email, to learn more about the themes in her work and how her Ethiopian heritage informs her illustrations. Read it below and see more of Trap Bob's works underneath.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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