News Brief

Nike Announces New 'Pro Hijab' for Muslim Women Athletes

Nike announced on Tuesday, that it will be releasing a new performance hijab for Muslim athletes.

Last year at the Olympics, Egypt's beach volleyball team made history as they became the first Egyptian team to participate in the competition since it began in 1966, and the first to compete in the game in full sleeves and hijab.


Athletic wear for women who wear hijab is expanding, as sports retailer, Nike, announced on Tuesday, that it will be releasing the "Pro Hijab," a sportswear version of the hijab, that they hope will "inspire more women and girls in the Middle East, who face barriers and limited access to sport."

According to the company, the new athletic gear was tested by Muslim athletes from a range of sports. This helped determine the right fabric and style for the "Pro Hijab." Nike says that the line will feature adjustable and breathable designs that "will come in dark neutral colors, at the request of the athletes, with the Nike Swoosh coming above the left ear to showcase the hijab's pinnacle performance nature."

In order to assure that the design met "cultural variances," the sports company reportedly reached out to community advocates from various countries for direction on how to make the design accomidating to various styles of hijab.

"The Nike Pro Hijab has been a year in the making," says the company in a press release. "But its impetus can be traced much further back to Nike's founding mission, to serve athletes, with the signature addendum: If you have a body, you're an athlete."

Nike launched its campaign last month with an ad highlighting Muslim women athletes, narrated by Saudi Arabian actor Fatima Al-Banawi. View it below.

The Pro Hijab will hit Nike stores in 2018.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Ethic's Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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