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The Washington Slizzards Have the Smoothest Song You'll Hear All Week

Ras Nebyu, Haile Supreme and Corbin Butler connect for "Don't Forget."

We've been following the output of the D.C.-based rapper Ras Nebyu since his addictive Ethiopian cover of "Controlla."

The Ethiopian-American rapper now comes through with the visual for "Don't Forget," a track built on one of the smoothest bass lines we've heard in a long while.

"Don't Forget" sees Nebyu connecting with two other buzzing D.C. artists, rapper/producer Corbin Butler and Haile Supreme (of Congo Sanchez). All three are members of the Washington Slizzards, a creative collective of artists coming out of an increasingly flourishing D.C. rap scene.


"'Don't Forget' is a song about remembering all the good & bad things you have endured in life with as little regret as possible because all these things make you who you are in the present moment," Ras Nebyu tells us. The track, which was produced by Arckitech, was featured in Nebyu's latest project, Slizzatrism.

The single's music video, created by Slizzica & Kubi, follows the three artists as they make their way around the city's U St. area—spot classic D.C. establishments like Ben's Chili Bowl in the background.

Get into the music video for "Don't Forget," premiering here today, below.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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