Watch Reason and Ginger Trill’s Music Video for Their Politically Charged Single ‘Cashless Society’

Reason and Ginger Trill share grimy visuals for 'Cashless Society.'

Reason has finally released the visuals for "Cashless Society," one of the strongest songs in his latest album, 2018's Azania.


The song features fellow wordsmith Ginger Trill. The two rappers each speak their mind about the state of affairs in South Africa's townships, a majority of which were built by the apartheid government as dumping sites for black people.

The song's visuals were directed and filmed by Cape Town director Motion Billy. The video's monochrome color scheme is fitting for a song about one of the biggest forced removals in the world's history.

In their verses, Reason and Ginger Trill are like news reporters telling their listeners about what's happening in the country's ghettos. Reason paints the picture of how citizens get robbed by criminals who themselves are victims of apartheid's legacy, rapping:

"They telling you shut up and drop on knees/ You screaming and begging, 'Oh stop it, please'/ They not even asking you properly/ With your wife and the kids in the property"

Ginger Trill does the same, with the most notable quotable in his verse being, "You gotta buy the land you want some property/ Wasn't educated properly/ Fuck I know about a title deed," which speaks to the burning issue of land reform in South Africa that the ANC government has dismally failed to initiate more than 25 years after apartheid ended.

"Cashless Society" is a single form Reason's 2018 album Azania.

Watch the music video for the song below, and stream the album underneath.


Reason ft Ginger Trill - Cashless Society (Official Music Video) youtu.be




Audio
(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

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