Audio

?uestlove, Tony Allen, TV On The Radio, Spoek + More on RED HOT + FELA LP

See the RED HOT + FELA album tracklist with artists like Questlove, Tony Allen, TV On the Radio, Childish Gambino and many more.


RED HOT recently announced the tracklist for their upcoming Fela Kuti tribute album titled RED HOT + FELA. The compilation is set to have various contemporary musicians and recording artists pay homage to the late great Fela Kuti, who unexpectedly passed away from complications brought on by the AIDS virus in 1997. The album features thirteen Fela tracks, all remade by popular artist from the likes of legendary afrobeat pioneer Tony Allenfellow drummer ?uestlove of The Roots, TV On The Radio members, Baloji, Nneka, Spoek Mathambo, Just A BandZaki Ibrahim  — and the previously featured "Lady" (below) by ?uesto, Tune-Yards, Angelique Kidjo and Akua Naura. Look down below for the track listing from the upcoming album, dropping October 8th via Knitting Factory Records.

RED HOT + FELA Tracklist

01 Baloji & L'Orchestre de la Katuba [ft. Kuku]: "Buy Africa"

02 tUnE-yArDs, ?uestlove, Angelique Kidjo, & Akua Naru: "Lady"

03 Spoek Mathambo & Zaki Ibrahim: "Yellow Fever"

04 Nneka, Sinkane, Amayo & Superhuman Happiness: "No Buredi"

05 Just a Band & Childish Gambino: "Who No Know Go No"

06 My Morning Jacket, Merrill Garbus, Brittany Howard: "Trouble Sleep Yanga Wake Am"

07 Kyp Malone, Tunde Adebimpe, Kronos Quartet, Stuart Bogie: "Sorrow Tears and Blood"

08 Superhuman Happiness, Sahr Ngaujah, Abena Koomson, Rubblebucket: "ITT"

09 Tony Allen, M1, Baloji: "Afrodisco Beat 2013"

10 Just A Band, Bajah, Chance the Rapper: "Gentleman"

11 GendEr Infinity: "Hi Life Time"

12 Spoek Mathambo, Cerebral Cortex, Frown: "Zombie"

13 King: "Go Slow"

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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