Op-Ed

Rest in Peace Terence Crutcher—Keep Kneeling Colin Kaepernick

Terence Crutcher was murdered by police, Friday lending new urgency to Colin Kaepernick's protest during the national anthem.

A black man in America was once again murdered by police.


His name is Terence Crutcher and he was 40-years-old and one month when he was killed, Friday. A father of four, Crutcher sang in his church choir and was returning from a music appreciation class at a Tulsa, Oklahoma college when his car stalled.

In the videos of his death we see a man alone with his hands up.

Video from the police helicopter shows a car in the middle of an empty road. As Crutcher walks toward it with his hands up the voice on the video calls him a "bad dude" and "probably on something."

It is unclear from the footage how the voices are able to make that call.

The people defending the police will say the circumstances are far from clear and they're right— clarity is elusive. But even if he was a "bad dude" or "on something"—and there's no evidence that he was—these do not give police license to murder.

San Francisco Giants quarterback Colin Kaepernick's brave refusal to stand for the national anthem at football games has been met with a deluge of commentary, much of it among the most twisted and fallacious ever uttered by political and sports pundits. We don't need to rehash it here.

Kaepernick's protest is a simple symbolic act that is having massive cultural significance. Here at Okayafrica, we kneel in solidarity with Kaepernick and with Black Lives Matter and in memory of Terence Crutcher. Rest in power Terence. May peace come to you.

 

 

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Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

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