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Mozambican Artist Samito Blends 80s Pop and Soukous in His Debut Album

Montreal-based Mozambican artist and songwriter Samito shares a stream of his debut album.

Samito, the Montreal-based Mozambican artist and songwriter released his debut album earlier this week with Costume Records. The self-titled album, Samito, includes eight tracks from the artist highlighting his unique and distinctive new-age electronica sound.


“There's some Tom Waits, Céu, Tears for Fears, Patrick Watson, Gavinsky, etc. Also some soukous and afro-beat guitars, 80's pop, a pantsula bassline and other grooves.”

The album serves as a breakthrough for the newly emerging artist. Prepared in less than a month, Samito reimagines the landscape of afro-inspired beats in a new age.

"Behind this album is a certain tolerance to risk, intuition. The whole record was written, arranged, recorded, mixed and mastered within a period of 20 days between March and April, 2016. We recorded 9 songs [in two days], two of which didn't make it to the record. Instead we added ‘Tiku la Hina”

Tiku la Hina,” which debuted late last year as Samito’s first single was selected as one of our top songs of 2015.

Listen to Samito’s entire debut album below.

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(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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