News Brief

The U.S. Plans To Deport Up to 4,000 Somali Migrants

Somalia's U.S. ambassador, Ahmed Isse Awad, says that the U.S. plans to send around 4,000 Somali asylum-seekers back to their homeland.

On Saturday, Somalia's U.S. ambassador, Ahmed Isse Awad, shared news of the U.S. government's plan to deport up to 4,000 Somalis back to their homeland.


"We learned through immigration sources that the total number of the Somalis that are in the books of [U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement] to be removed are close to 4,000," he told VOA. "Most of them are not in detention centers."

Around 170 Somali migrants have been sent back to Mogadishu since the embassy reopened in November 2015 for various reasons. Some were rejected asylum-seekers, while others were accused of breaking the law, reports VOA. Many of those whose applications have been denied still remain in detention centers or prisons, said Awad.

He received news that just under 300 Somali's are scheduled to be sent back in the upcoming months. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), recently arrested 82 migrants near Washington D.C., from 26 different nations. About 68 of them are said to have a criminal record. Others face deportation for overstaying their visas, ICE told VOA.

In previous years, Somali migrants were commonly granted clemency upon arriving in the U.S., but rather unsurprisingly, policies have stiffened under Trump.

The U.S. is not the only country intensifying its immigration policies either. Last month, activists in the UK blocked a mass deportation flight carrying Nigerian and Ghanaian asylum-seekers from leaving London's Stansted Airport—bringing the country's hostile immigration laws to light.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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