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Coloured South African Nationalists Want a 'Wexit' for the Western Cape

The Wexit would entail South Africa's Western Cape province being granted sovereignty.

The desire for an autonomous Western Cape province is not a new one. It was expressed circa 2007 particularly by Coloured and White Afrikaans South Africans. More recently, according to the Mail&Guardian, the Colored nationalist group Gatvol Capetonian has reinvigorated the desire for a Wexit amid climbing racial tensions in the province.


The Western Cape is one of South Africa's nine provinces and is home to the notable coastal city of Cape Town. The province is largely populated by Colored South Africans, a mixed racial group arising from White and non-White South Africans. The Western Cape also has quite a heavy White Afrikaans presence - white South Africans who are descendants of the Dutch colonizers of the country.

The group Gatvol Capetonian (fed-up Cape resident), which initially planned on contesting in the upcoming 2019 elections but recently withdrew, is once again urging for the Western Cape to become politically and economically independent from the rest of the country.

The leader of Gatvol Capetonian Fadiel Adams said:

"I'm not going to take offence if you call me a Colored nationalist because nobody cares about the so-called Colored people. We care about Capetonians. We don't care about your race, your religion or your sexual orientation."

This comes after increasing racial tensions which are a result of the Colored community feeling entirely neglected by the current ruling Black government, the African National Congress (ANC). Colored people have, following Apartheid years, become the grey area in a South Africa that is so often strictly black and white.

The Cape Party, a minor opposition party as well as infamously racist Afrikaans musician Steve Hofmeyr, are just some of the supporters of Wexit. Major opposition party, the Democratic Alliance (DA), which governs the Western Cape, opposes Wexit and has said that the move would be selfish and a return to a province that 'only wants to enrich itself'.

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Photo by Jekesai Njikizana/AFP via Getty Images.

Zimbabwe's Nelson Chamisa Removed As Leader of Main Opposition Party

The Supreme Court of Zimbabwe has ruled that Nelson Chamisa is the 'illegitimate' leader of the MDC and has removed him from the position.

Nelson Chamisa has been removed as the leader of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC), according to the BBC.

The Zimbabwean Supreme Court ruled that Chamisa is the "illegitimate" leader of the main opposition party and has legally returned him to the position he held back 2015 of Secretary for Policy. Thokozane Kupe will now reportedly assume legitimate leadership of the political party, My Zimbabwe reports.

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Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak Passes Away

The former Egyptian president, who was ousted in 2011 during the Arab Spring Uprising, was aged 91.

Egypt's former President Hosni Mubarak passed away yesterday according to reports by the BBC.

The former statesman's death comes barely a year after his successor and Egypt's first democratically-elected president Mohamed Morsi, suffered a fatal heart attack.

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Photo courtesy of Upile Chisala.

Join Upile Chisala For Soothing Readings of Her Latest Works

Malawian poet Upile Chisala is set to deliver readings from her three poetry collections on Instagram Live.

Malawian poet Upile Chisala is set to deliver readings of her latest works of poetry on Instagram Live this week.

On the 7th of April, she'll be hosting a session where she'll read from her first two works Soft Magic and Nectar while the session on the 8th of April will include a reading from her latest work titled A Fire Like You. Both sessions will take place at 8 PM (SAST).

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Justice Mukheli. Courtesy of Black Major/Bongeziwe Mabandla.

Interview: Bongeziwe Mabandla's New Album Is a Calm Meditation On Relationships

We speak with the South African artist about his captivating new album, iimini, love cycles, and the unexpected influence of Bon Iver.

"I've been playing at home for so many years and pretending to be having shows in my living room, and today it's actually happening," Bongeziwe Mabandla says, smiling out at me from my cellphone as I watch him play songs on Instagram Live, guitar close to his chest.

Two weekends ago, Mabandla was meant to be celebrating the release of his third album, iimini, at the Untitled Basement in Braamfontein in Joburg, which would no doubt have been packed with some of the many fans the musician has made since his debut release, Umlilo, in 2012. With South Africa joining many other parts of the world in a lockdown, those dates were cancelled and Mabandla, like many other artists, took to social media to still play some tracks from the album. The songs on iimini are about the life and death of a relationship—songs that are finding their way into the hearts of fans around the world, some of whom, now stuck in isolation, may be having to confront the ups and downs of love, with nowhere to hide.

The day before his Instagram Live mini-show, Mabandla spoke to OkayAfrica on lockdown from his home in Newtown about the lessons he's learned from making the album, his new-found love for Bon Iver, and how he's going to be spending his time over the next few weeks.

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