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Coloured South African Nationalists Want a 'Wexit' for the Western Cape

The Wexit would entail South Africa's Western Cape province being granted sovereignty.

The desire for an autonomous Western Cape province is not a new one. It was expressed circa 2007 particularly by Coloured and White Afrikaans South Africans. More recently, according to the Mail&Guardian, the Colored nationalist group Gatvol Capetonian has reinvigorated the desire for a Wexit amid climbing racial tensions in the province.


The Western Cape is one of South Africa's nine provinces and is home to the notable coastal city of Cape Town. The province is largely populated by Colored South Africans, a mixed racial group arising from White and non-White South Africans. The Western Cape also has quite a heavy White Afrikaans presence - white South Africans who are descendants of the Dutch colonizers of the country.

The group Gatvol Capetonian (fed-up Cape resident), which initially planned on contesting in the upcoming 2019 elections but recently withdrew, is once again urging for the Western Cape to become politically and economically independent from the rest of the country.

The leader of Gatvol Capetonian Fadiel Adams said:

"I'm not going to take offence if you call me a Colored nationalist because nobody cares about the so-called Colored people. We care about Capetonians. We don't care about your race, your religion or your sexual orientation."

This comes after increasing racial tensions which are a result of the Colored community feeling entirely neglected by the current ruling Black government, the African National Congress (ANC). Colored people have, following Apartheid years, become the grey area in a South Africa that is so often strictly black and white.

The Cape Party, a minor opposition party as well as infamously racist Afrikaans musician Steve Hofmeyr, are just some of the supporters of Wexit. Major opposition party, the Democratic Alliance (DA), which governs the Western Cape, opposes Wexit and has said that the move would be selfish and a return to a province that 'only wants to enrich itself'.

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Photo courtesy of Darey.

Meet Nigeria’s All-Female Bikers Club, Featured In Darey's Latest Video

Darey collaborates with all-female bike riders to reimagine a pandemic-free world in the new video for "Jojo."

In 2017, when Jeminat Olumegbon, an events manager in Lagos, set up the Female Bikers initiative (FBi) with her friend, Nnenna Samuila, the objective for the organisation was to facilitate some form of education for Nigerian women. "A bunch of us, bike riders, came together because we knew when we ride we draw attention to ourselves so we used that as a form of communication starter, especially in rural areas," Olumegbon, code-named Speed Diva, tells OkayAfrica via a phone call. In the three years since the initiative has been in operation, it has started a number of programs aimed at confronting socio-cultural barriers set against women in Nigeria but none is more resonant than the group's campaign against breast and cervical cancer.

"We found out that a lot of women die of breast and cervical cancer in Nigeria and they shouldn't be dying because there are preventive measures but lack of knowledge is what is really killing us," Olumegbon says. According to Nigeria's Cancer Control Plan, breast and cervical cancer are the most prevalent forms of cancer in Nigeria, disproportionately affecting women. And the Female Bikers initiative, a scion of D'Angels Motorcycle Club, Nigeria's first all-female bikers club, is working hard to get women tested early.

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Watch Wizkid’s New Music Video For ‘Smile’ Featuring H.E.R.

The Nigerian star dedicated the new video to his three sons: Bolu, Ayo and Zion Balogun.