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Queer South African Performance Art Duo FAKA Slays For Unlabelled Magazine

Issue three of South African youth culture magazine Unlabelled features an intimate photos series with queer performance collective FAKA

Images courtesy of Unlabelled Magazine


Unlabelled is a South African youth culture publication founded by Johannesburg-based entrepreneur Phendu Kuta. Since its inception in August 2014, the online magazine has run a steady stream of carefully-curated editorials and features, like this dope profile on DJ Doowap and this vibrant photo series from Nikki ZakkasUnlabelled recently published their stunning third issue. One highlight this installment is a run-down on a pair of powerful queer tastemakers.

Performance art duo turned queer culture movement, FAKA is comprised of best friends FelaGucci and Desire Marea. The two work together to create performances that reflect the complexity of being black and queer in South Africa. "We use performance as a medium to manifest the realities that we desire for the black queer South African," the pair told Unlabelled.

"We feel that there is a lack of a wide and true representation of queer voices in popular media," they continue in the interview. "Our voices are never given the platform to be expressed by us hence we've taken it upon ourselves to do this. We are not willing to Wait for Lorraine." In the future, FAKA seeks to strengthen their archive of young black queer people and to create an LGBTI organization and support system.

The piece, titled Faka- Exploring Our Complex Identities Through Performance, is paired with an intimate photo series shot by Khongi Sono with art direction from Size Mbiza and Mongezi Mcelu. Head to Unlabelled for the full spread. Keep up with FAKA on Tumblr/Facebook/Soundcloud.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

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