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Cinemafrique: Watch 'Soweto Rising,' A Mini-Doc Dialogue On Johannesburg Street Culture

Watch 'Soweto Rising,' a new mini-documentary from South African filmmakers Noxolo Mafu and Lilian Magari.


Soweto Rising is a new mini-documentary from South African filmmakers Noxolo Mafu and Lilian Magari. The project, filmed over a two-week period, captures Soweto's role as a rapidly evolving hub for creative expression in the midst of socio-economic change. Billed as a "dialogue on Johannesburg Street Culture," the 23-minute documentary also highlights the renewed sense of hometown pride and personal identity emerging in Soweto. Personal interviews with key figures in the township's artistic scenes, such as Mkay Frash of Boyznbucks, streetwear label head Wandile Zondo, and izikhothane personalities Don Dada and King Mosha, round out the film to make Soweto Rising a quick yet compelling look at street culture in the birthplace of kwaito. Read a brief synopsis of Soweto Rising and watch the entire film below.

Soweto Rising is a cutting edge urban street culture film which tracks the influence of Soweto as a former “township” space on the pulse of contemporary street culture in Johannesburg.The film provides a fast paced, gritty yet colourful experience of the Johannesburg contemporary cultural scene and initiates a dialogue around the experience of street culture through the eyes of well respected creatives and trendsetters in around Johannesburg. Filmmakers Noxolo Mafu and Lilian Magari sat down with Soweto’s very own Wandile Zondo (co-founder of the clothing concept store, Thesis), Mkay Frash and widely publicised Izikhothane members such as Don Dada , as they share insight on their experience of the city.The film provides an authentic view of the city from sneaker heads to izikhothane in a way that tracks the infectious pulse of the city.

H/T We-Are-Awesome

Interview

Sarkodie Is Not Feeling Any Pressure

The elite Ghanaian rapper affirms his king status with this seventh studio album, No Pressure.

Sarkodie is one of the most successful African rappers of all time. With over ten years of industry presence under his belt, there's no question about his prowess or skin in the game. Not only is he a pioneer of African hip-hop, he's also the most decorated African rapper, having received over 100 awards from close to 200 nominations over the span of his career.

What else does Sarkodie have to prove? For someone who has reached and stayed at the pinnacle of hip-hop for more than a decade, he's done it all. But despite that, he's still embracing new growth. One can tell just by listening to his latest album, No Pressure, Sarkodie's seventh studio album, and the follow-up to 2019's Black Love which brought us some of the Ghanaian star's best music so far. King Sark may be as big as it gets, but the scope of his music is still evolving.

Sonically, No Pressure is predominantly hip-hop, with the first ten tracks offering different blends of rap topped off with a handful of afrobeats and, finally, being crowned at the end with a gospel hip-hop cut featuring Ghanaian singer MOG. As far as the features go, Sark is known for collaborating mostly with his African peers but this time around he branches out further to feature a number of guests from around the world. Wale, Vic Mensa, and Giggs, the crème de la crème of rap in America and the UK respectively all make appearances, as well as Nigeria's Oxlade, South Africa's Cassper Nyovest, and his fellow Ghanaian artists Darkovibes and Kwesi Arthur.

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