Video

Spoek Mathambo's 'Future Sound Of Mzansi' Documentary Is Now Streaming

Spoek Mathambo's new documentary on South African electronic music, 'Future Sound of Msanzi', is now available for online streaming,


If you haven't already noticed, South Africa's cultural sphere is enjoying an exciting golden period of new and diverse forms of artistic expression — most notably within the realms of electronic music. The infinitely talented Spoek Mathambo is often seen as one of the chief ambassadors of this new "Mzansi renaissance," and his new documentary Future Sound of Mzansi is a powerful exploration and interrogation of South Africa's fertile creative scene.

Directed by Mathambo himself and Lebogang Rasethaba of Egg Films, Future Sound of Mzansi explores the past, present and future of South Africa's electronic music scene and the multitude of sub-genres that lie within it. The film also features an exciting cast of the country's leading artists and includes interviews with Okmalumkoolkat, Nozinja, Jumping Back Slash, Black Coffee, Christian Tiger SchoolBIG FKN GUN, DJ Spoko, and Sibot.

Part one of the three-part series, now available through Vice's THUMP, introduces the fresh new sounds originating from townships and urban areas in cities like Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg. The idea of regionalism in the development of South African electronic music's seemingly endless amount of genres becomes the central theme of this first installment. Artists such as Nozinja and Black Coffee offer interesting tid-bits and passionate insight from their own experiences of how representation and ownership of identity play important roles in the unique music they create. Watch part one of Spoek Mathambo's Future Sound Mzansi below and revisit his Future Sound of Mzansi curated mixtape series.

Update 5/27: Watch the second installment of the documentary, which focuses on Cape Town, below.

Part 1:

Part 2:

Music
Photo courtesy of AYLØ.

Interview: AYLØ Bridges His Music & Universe In the 'Clairsentience' EP

The Nigerian artist talks about trusting your gut feelings, remedying imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do.

AYLØ's evolution as an artist has led him to view sensitivity as a gift. As the alté soundscape in the Nigerian scene gains significant traction, his laser focus cuts through the tempting smokescreen of commercial success. AYLØ doesn't make music out of need or habit. It all boils down to the power of feeling. "I know how I can inspire people when I make music, and how music inspires me. Now it's more about the message."

Clairsentience, the title of the Nigerian artist's latest EP, is simply defined as the ability to perceive things clearly. A clairsentient person perceives the world through their emotions. Contrary to popular belief, clairsentience isn't a paranormal sixth sense reserved for the chosen few, our inner child reveals that it's an innate faculty that lives within us before the world told us who to be.

Born in 1994 in Benin City, Nigeria, AYLØ knew he wanted to be a musician since he was six-years-old. Raised against the colorful backdrop of his dad's jazz records and the echoes of church choirs from his mother's vast gospel collections, making music isn't something anyone pushed him towards, it organically came to be. By revisiting his past to reconcile his promising future, he shares that, "Music is about your experiences. You have to live to write shit. Everything adds up to the music."

Our conversation emphasized the importance of trusting your gut feelings, how to remedy imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do,

This interview has been edited for purposes of brevity and clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Bobi Wine and His Wife Released from House Arrest

Ugandan politician Bobi Wine and his wife Barbara Itungo Kyagulanyi have been released from a near two-week military house arrest following a recent ruling from a Ugandan court.