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"Africa’s First Afrobeat Dance Movie" Is Coming Soon

The filmmakers behind "Africa’s first afrobeat dance movie" look to showcase Lagos' best underground dance moves and raise diabetes awareness

Source: tdmpthemovie.com


There's a new Nigerian dance movie on the way.

The team behind the forthcoming comedy-drama The Dance Movie Project, or #TDMP, call their film the first of its kind. "Africa's first afrobeat dance movie," to be specific. And the filmmakers aren't just determined to showcase some of the best underground moves in Lagos–they also hope to raise awareness around diabetes and its impact on the continent. (As a diabetic myself, this certainly caught my eye).

Directed by Idahosa Osagie and produced by Alexander “Lexx” Ore, the movie tells the story of two Nigerian dancer brothers, Femi and Wale. As explained in a press release:

“The Dance Movie Project (TDMP) follows two brothers who despite the disapproval of their single mother, continue to chase their passion for dance in Lagos, Nigeria. The lives of the brothers take an unexpected turn for the worst, when their ailing mother is diagnosed with diabetes. As the brothers scramble to find options to save her life, the largest national dance competition in Nigeria’s history is announced with a lucrative prize pool. The brothers alongside their dance crew decide to embark on a journey to compete in the national dance championship.”

The filmmakers tell us #TDMP is slated to play in cinemas across the African continent beginning in May 2016. Until then, watch the film's trailer below.

Keep up with #TDMP on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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