Arts + Culture

New York-Based Curator Dexter Wimberly Is Bringing The Work Of These 4 African Artists To North Carolina

A new exhibition in Raleigh will spotlight the work of four African artists based in the U.S.

Kindred, 2014, graphite, ink, pigment, enamel, photo transfers, glitter on paper, 80” x 78”

Photo courtesy of Tiwani Contemporary, London and the artist


New York-based independent curator Dexter Wimberly is a new school force in the contemporary art world. Next month, the former Director of Strategic Planning at Independent Curators International is headed to Raleigh, North Carolina, as the curator of an ambitious new spotlight on African artists.

The Ease of Fiction will bring together the work of four U.S.-based African artists–ruby onyinyechi amanze (b. 1982, Nigeria), Duhirwe Rushemeza (b. 1977, Rwanda), Sherin Guirguis (b. 1974, Egypt), and Meleko Mokgosi (b. 1981, Botswana)–as “the foundation of a critical discussion about history, fact and fiction.”

According to information provided in a press release:

The exhibition’s title evokes the idea that people are often more comfortable accepting or believing what is told them by those in power, rather than challenging and investigating the authenticity of information presented as historical fact. Interweaving their personal experiences and memories into broader historical contexts, these artists create work that is in strident opposition of passive acceptance.

The artists' cultural backgrounds, as well as geographic diversity, create an opportunity for a provocative examination of varied perspectives of the truth. Although these artists are from four different African countries their work addresses universal issues that are relevant across all borders.

The Ease of Fiction is on view at CAM Raleigh in Raleigh, North Carolina, March 3 through June 19, 2016. Head here for more information and check out a selection of the artwork below.

Ruse of Disavowal, 2013, oil and charcoal on canvas. Photo courtesy of Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles and the artist. Installation view: Lyon Biennale, Museum of Contemporary Art, Lyon, France
Untitled (Babel Hadeed) 2013, mixed media on hand-cut paper, 108 x 72 inches. Photo courtesy of The Third Line Gallery, Dubai and the artist
Red Ochre, White, and Blue, 2014. Thin Set Mortar, Wood, Acrylic, and Metal Detritus, 48" x 48" x 5" Photo courtesy of the artist

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