Audio

Stream Two Atmospheric Tinariwen Remixes From Daniel Lanois & The Antlers

Producer/guitarist Daniel Lanois and indie trio The Antlers each remix a song by Northern Malian desert blues band Tinariwen.


Producer/guitarist Daniel Lanois and indie trio The Antlers each recently remixed a song by Northern Malian desert blues band Tinariwen. In an entertaining video that's part road movie and part science experiment, Lanois adds electronic whirs and stretches to "Adounia Ti Chidjret," an elegantly rustic bonus track on Tinariwen's latest album Emaar. Through grainy, slightly scratched footage, the Brian Eno disciple actually remixes the song on a multi-track control panel as he sits in a 1970s Cadillac, bobbing his head with his friends. Check it out below.

With their remix of Emaar opener "Toumast Tincha," The Antlers don't simply make the track bigger or louder. In fact, they show an intriguing method of emphasis-by-de-emphasis; they muffle Tinariwen's deep voices and multi-mooded guitars but only as a means of bringing attention to those sounds. By accentuating other parts of the song — the drum taps, the sound of water — the band retains the spirit of "Toumast Tincha," honoring Tinariwen in the process. Listen below and catch the three acts tonight at Brooklyn Masonic Temple for ANTI-Thesis, an event curated by Daniel Lanois that will feature full sets by The Antlers, Tinariwen, Lanois himself, and an appearance from artist/educator Lonnie Holley.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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