Audio

Tony Dangler 'No Manners' (Produced By DESERT_HEΔD)

Joburg rapper Tony Dangler crashed onto our radar with 'No Manners' (produced by DESERT_HEΔD aka Christian Tiger School's Luc Vermeer.


Photo by Adriaan Louw, via The Fader

South African rapper Tony Dangler crashed onto our radar last week with a spooky boom bap introduction on "No Manners." Pietermaritzburg raised, Dangler (aka Fudge Da Fugitive) has been in the mix of Gauteng hip-hop circles for a minute now as a member of Joburg's Revivolution Clique. On his latest effort he's joined forces with Cape Town beatmaker DESERT_HEΔD aka Christian Tiger School's Luc Vermeer on a heavy-hitting bout of no-nonsense Nightmare On Elm Street hip-hop. Dangler broke the track down for The Fader (where it premiered):

"In a nutshell, it’s what I go through in a day in my life. It kind of relays a story about me — this guy with a kind of poorer background [who] is now living in Johannesburg. I tried to touch on my financial situation and how I’d like to improve on that. I talk about how maybe I have been slept-on and it’s time you give me a chance and let me come up like other kids. I talk about world issues, I talk about political issues that affect our country, and I talk a bit about how dope I am."

Listen to Tony Dangler's "No Manners" (produced by DESERT_HEΔD) below.

Film
(Youtube)

10 African Films That Deal With Protest Culture & History

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression, and this has been represented significantly in cinema.

Around the world, Nigerians in the diaspora have picked up the mantle of protesting peacefully against police brutality and violence. These gatherings are a direct extension of the nationwide protests that were brought to a tragic halt in Lagos after soldiers of the Nigerian army fired guns at peaceful protesters at the Lekki tollgate venue.

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression and this has been represented significantly in cinema. This list, while not an exhaustive one, attempts to contextualize this rich cinematic history, tracing the complex and diverse ways that protest culture have been reflected in African film. From influential classics that are now considered required viewing to fascinating portraits of individual resistance, these films are proof that the struggle continues, regardless.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

The 6 Best East African Songs of the Month (October)

Featuring Nadia Mukami, Zuchu x Joeboy, John Blaq and more.