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10 South African YouTubers You Need To Be Watching

These are the top 10 South African YouTubers around right now.

South Africa's video blogging scene is steadily growing as a lot of opinionated young people are taking advantage of the tools and platforms at their disposal to tell their own stories, express themselves, or just make their fans laugh.


While a large number of vloggers opt to share their videos on Facebook because of ease of access, their YouTube numbers are impressive too.

From the hilarious Fash Ngobese, to the unrelenting Sibu Mpanza, the quirky Pap Culture, and the humorous Mark Futzgibbon, among others, we bring you 10 South African vloggers worth checking out as you procrastinate to study or abuse your office Wi-Fi connection on.

Check them out below, listed in no particular order.

1. Fash Ngobese aka Yes Fash

Yes Fash's videos are mostly about how different types of people (race, gender, class) react to various scenarios. Fash's videos are humorous in that they are a tongue-in-cheek take on situations we all find ourselves in. And his ability to play different characters in one clip—think of Eddie Murphy or Tyler Perry—is so seamless, you forget it's just one person on the video.

Follow Fash Ngobese on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

2. Siyabulela Deli aka TaFire

TaFire is also great at impersonating different kinds of South Africans. One of his funniest videos is one in which he role plays how black, coloured and white Afrikaaner people would react if approached to taste a new burger from Burger King. His impersonations are hilarious and he's able to switch between the different accents seamlessly. TaFire's clips, which mostly go viral on Facebook, landed him a TV role on the soapies, Isibaya, last year.

Follow TaFire on Twitter, Facebook and and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

3. Pap Culture

Pap Culture is run by three vloggers, Nwabisa Mda, Thembe Mahlaba and Bongeka Masango. The trio tackle serious issues, such as rape culture, race, gender, hair, money and all kinds of isms, in a light-hearted but engaging way. Their videos are categorized into talks, challenges and their infamous dashboard cam. On their recent series, called #BehindTheseWalls, they ask personal questions to different celebrities of their choice. Pap Culture have hosted the likes of Kwesta, Lady Skollie, Anne Hirsch, and many other different personalities.

Follow Pap Culture on Twitter, Facebook and subscribe to their YouTube channel.

4. Sibu Mpanza

Sibu Mpanza is edgy and clever just like Pap Culture. His videos also tackle heavy topics, but with subtle humor, sarcasm, and sometimes using anecdotes to approach a topic. He comments on current issues ranging from politics, race, gender, and sexual violence, among others. Sibu is also a serial collaborator, having made videos with Microwave Boyz, Broke Niggaz, Okay Wasabi and Pap Culture, among others.

Follow Sibu Mpanza on Twitter, Facebook and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

5. Mark Fitzgibbon

Mark Fitzgibbon's vlogs poke fun at being young coloured, specifically Cape Coloured. He covers themes such as relationships, pop culture, and social issues in a light-hearted manner. He's made videos about not having abs, not having a winter bae, being harassed on a train, but one theme he keeps returning to is the "tief"–Cape Coloured slang for "bitch." A hilarious blogger, but not for the faint-hearted. You've been warned.

Follow Mark Fitzgibbon on Twitter, Facebook and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

6. Broke Niggaz

Broke Niggaz is a web reality series founded by vlogger Menzi Anarchadium. Him and his friends discuss issues that have to do with being young, black and, well, broke. Their videos are quirky, funny, and sadly relatable, as they touch on issues like struggling with adulating and the hypocrisy of the internet, among other issues that a young black man who's either a student or a young professional struggles with.

Follow Anarchadium on Twitter, and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

7. The Microwave Boys

The Microwave Boys are a trio of friends who host a show in which they give their take on current issues, from Migos and Joe Budden's "beef" to Grace Mugabe's shenanigans, and everything in between. If watching three energetic and highly-opinionated dudes dissect current affairs and pop culture while laughing hysterically is your thing, then The Microwave Boys are here for you.

Follow The Microwave Boys on Twitter, Facebook and subscribe to Anarchadium's YouTube channel for their videos.

8. Lasizwe Dambuza

Lasizwe Dambuza makes videos of different scenarios such as how a black girl reacts to being spanked during sex, how black students get baffled by Afrikaans exams, how black parents respond to their kids coming out. But his most popular videos is a parody of media personality Bonang Matheba's reality show "Being Bonang," in which Lasizwe imagines Queen B's reaction to allegations against boyfriend AKA cheating on her. Lasizwe is a shape shifter who can emulate all kinds of people.

Follow Lasizwe Dambuza on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

9. Theodora Lee

Theodora Lee's vlogs are halfway between light-hearted and serious. Using her life experiences as an entry point, she reflects and give tips on issues such as mental illness, dating, beauty and health. If you would like to get into the head of a young South African trying to make sense of the world around her, while getting your funny bone tickled, Theo is your girl.

Follow Theodora Lee on Twitter, Facebook and subscribe to her YouTube channel.

10. Okay Wasabi

Okay Wasabi, who's also a rapper, makes parodies of hip-hop songs, an art that isn't that big in South Africa. His parody of DJ Citi Lyts' hit single " Vura," is called "Dudla," and revolves around being overweight. He has made parodies of hip-hop hits such as Anatii and AKA's "The Saga," Emtee's "Roll Up," and a few more. But Wasabi's videos go beyond hip-hop parodies. He also does some comedy skits, and his latest series is called 'Kota Past 9," in which he and his friend Daliii taste kotas from different neighborhoods.

Follow Okay Wasabi on Twitter, Facebook and subscribe to his YouTube channel.

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South Africans will tell you that December is not just a month, it's an entire lifestyle. From beginning to end, it's about being immersed in a ton of activity with friends and family as well as any new folk you meet along the way. Whether you're looking to turn up to some good music or watch some provocative theater, our guide to just 14 cultural events happening in South Africa this December, has something for everyone.

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From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

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Nigerian Activist, Omoyele Sowore, Re-Arrested Just Hours After Being Released on Bail

Sowore, the organizer of Nigeria's #RevolutionNow protests, was detained by armed officers, once again, in court on Friday.

Omoyele Sowore, the Nigerian human rights activist and former presidential candidate who has spent over four months in jail under dubious charges, was re-arrested today in Lagos while appearing in court.

The journalist and founder of New York-based publication Sahara Reporters, had been released on bail the day before. He was arrested following his organization of nationwide #RevolutionNow protests in August. Since then, Sowore has remained in custody on what are said to be trumped-up charges, including treason, money laundering and stalking the president.

He appeared in court once again on Friday after being released on bail in federal court the previous day. During his appearance, Sowore was again taken into custody by Nigerian authorities.

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