popular

This Psychological Horror Film Exploring Black Trauma Will Give You Chills

The trailer for Uche Aguh's upcoming film 'The House Invictus' will leave you frightened, yet wanting more.

The House Invictus is the upcoming feature film by Nigerian filmmaker, Uche Aguh.

The thriller explores the effects of black trauma, as it tells the story of a group of black men participating in what, appears to be, a fateful initiation in a strikingly beautiful yet eerie setting.

Here's a full description of the film via Shadow and Act:

The House Invictus is a psychological thriller that examines the shared history of black folk in America, both modern, and past. Blood, chaos, upheaval, sex and religion and it's cultural fall out blended with the psychology of race, masculinity and the power of brotherhood.

The movie's stunning cinematography, and stark subject matter stand out in the recently released trailer. The movie stars actors Jarius Sowells, Kayode Akinyemi, Vincent Ramirez, Thiree Pinnock, Julian Horton, Obum Nwankwo and J. Shawn Durham.


For the filmmaker, the visual elements were at the forefront of telling the story. Aguh says that's it's left to viewers to further the conversation around the social themes that the film presents.

"To me, it's an exhibitionist film, something of a painting, or a gallery of paintings—The film does not justify, validate, or give reason to the issues discussed," the writer and director tells Shadow and Act. "It simply presents them in an artistic way, highlighting the ways they affect the characters involved, while leaving the audience with the opportunity to do the cerebral work of asking more questions and furthering the conversation along.

He also spoke with the publication about how his experiences as a black man in America have led him to dedicate much of his work to uplifting the narratives of people who look like him:

The film was written and directed by me, out of frustration. I had never intended to write a story so steeped in race. As a Nigerian-born American, I have found that in the past, I have always been a bit more reluctant and removed when it came to the conversation surrounding race in America. I had no real precedent for such a discussion as I didn't learn about slavery or racism in Nigeria. I also felt like I didn't own the space to talk about race as I always felt more Nigerian than American. But now, having lived in America, for a considerable portion of my adult life, I've come to understand the race conversation with first-hand encounters, and with the regime of the new presidency, I've become acutely even more vigilant in my awareness of these issues and my desire to talk about them regardless of my discomfort or the discomfort of anyone else.

The film's trailer will likely leave you frightened, yet wanting more. Check it out above. No word as to when the film will be released, but we'll keep you posted as we learn more.

popular

Listen to 10 Great Songs From Johnny Clegg

Here are some of the best songs to remember South Africa's son of the soil.

Yesterday, it was confirmed that South African musician, Johnny Clegg, passed away after a long battle with cancer.

Understandably, heartfelt tributes have been pouring in ever since. Long before it was cool (or even legal) to be in close proximity to blackness and anything attached to it in South Africa, Clegg, a white man, was doing just that. That is exactly why he was given the endearing title of South Africa's "son of the soil."

Growing up during Apartheid, Clegg was taught how to speak the Zulu language by a domestic worker named Charlie Mzila. In his teenage years, his appreciation for the Zulu culture continued and he soon learnt the traditional dance styles known as isishameni and also learnt how to play the Maskandi guitar. Clegg's music was a beacon of light during a very dark time in South Africa's history and his songs about Nelson Mandela (at a time where songs were banned for merely mentioning the name of the late statesman and other key struggle activists) brought the country together.

It is irrefutable that a music giant has fallen. However, Clegg leaves behind a wealth of music featuring other great South African artists and groups such as Zakwe, Brenda Fassie, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Juluka/Suvuka, among several others. His music undeniably brought South Africans and people all around the world together.

We've picked ten of our favorite songs from the late musician's discography in honor of a life that was lived to the fullest.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Stonebwoy in "Tuff Seed"

The 12 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Stonebwoy, Mahmoud Ahmed, Tiwa Savage x Zlatan, Africa Express, Juls x Mr Eazi and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's new playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Keep reading... Show less
Style

Beyoncé Wore These 2 African Designers in Her Music Video for 'Spirit'

Queen Bey continues to include and give a nod to African talent in her visuals.

As we draw even closer to Disney's The Lion King opening in theaters this week, Beyoncé continues to lead the way with her new music video for "Spirit"—the first single off of the film's album she produced and curated, The Lion King: The Gift.

Shot in the Havasu Falls in Arizona's Grand Canyon, Beyoncé and her legion of beautiful dancers are one with nature and its various elements as she beckons us to be brave and hear the calling of spirit. As we noted when she announced the album, the track opens with a call and response in Swahili that translates to "Long live the king": Uishi kwa mda mrefu mfalme—uishi kwa.

Keeping our eyes peeled for African influences in the music video, it's evident that is seen in the choreography. We even spotted our extended fam with the afrobeats moves—the AVO Boys: Stephen Ojo and Caleb Bonney—as two of her dancers in the video.

Beyoncé continues to also give a nod to African talent through the looks she donned in "Spirit" styled by her mainstay, Zerina Akers.

Take a look at the two African designers she wore in the video below.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.