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Trump Targets Rwanda With New Trade Rules

Donald Trump claims Rwanda's ban on American used clothing is hurting US interests.

Donald Trump will suspend duty-free clothing imports from Rwanda, following the country's decision to ban US second-hand clothing exports, reports Business Daily Africa.

Trump made the announcement in a letter on Thursday, in which he stated that "Rwanda's duty-free status for apparel will end in 60 days if no corrective actions are taken."

Adding that Rwanda's refusal of secondhand clothing from the United States defies the requirements set in the African Growth and Opportunity Act (Agoa), which gives specified African nations duty-free trade access to the US under certain conditions. One of them being removing barriers to trade and investment from the US.


Tanzania and Uganda also faced possible suspension, after a petition was raised by secondhand retailers claiming that a tariff on their goods in the aforementioned countries would harm the industry. Both Tanzania and Uganda removed such tariffs and remain part of Agoa.

With these sorts of trade "agreements" put in place, African countries face a unique dilemma. Rwanda was in a disadvantageous position whether it chose to remain part of Agoa or not. Is this what happens when African governments make even the slightest attempt to exert economic power over their own countries? According to both Trump and history, the answer is a resounding yes.

Coming 2 America: New Yorkers in Zamunda

Coming 2 America: If one can sit through cringey "African accents" and take the elephants as hyperbole, they could score some laughs for nostalgia's sake.

Coming to America, originally released in 1988, is a cringeworthy watch in 2021. The cult classic opens with the song "Imbube" performed by Ladysmith Black Mambazo and shows the royal family of Zamunda living alongside elephants and zebras. Throughout the film, Africans are portrayed as savages who don't understand basketball, marvel at discarded glass and can't use mop buckets.

With its recently released sequel, Coming 2 America, which comes 32 years later, the film's original writers and director Craig Bowler had an opportunity to place the franchise on the right side of history. They try, but, for the most part, they fail.

Whereas Coming to America followed Africans as they navigate The Big Apple, in Coming 2 America, it's Americans who find themselves in Zamunda. They are the outliers whose slang, mannerisms and casual dress deem them the savages in a royal house of great mannerisms and dignified language.

Now the new king of Zamunda after the death of his father King Jaffe Joffer, still played by James Earl Jones, Akeem (reprised by Eddie Murphy 32 years later) finds himself in many similar situations that his father also faced in the original film. He gets to navigate outdated traditions he struggled against in his youth. Much like King Jaffe did when he used his power to allow his son to marry Lisa McDowell (still played by Shari Headley from the original movie) more than 30 years ago, Akeem has to exercise discretion while adjusting the royal rules that aren't aligned with the modern world.

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(Youtube)

9 Must-Hear Songs From Ghana's Buzzing Drill Scene

We give you the rundown on Ghana's drill movement, Asakaa, and the most popular songs birthed by it.

Red bandanas, streetwear, security dogs, and gang signs. If you've been paying any attention to the music scene in Ghana over the past few months, then by now you would have noticed the rise of a special hip-hop movement. The movement is called Asakaa, and it's the Ghanaian take on the Chicago-born subgenre of hip-hop called drill music. It's fresh, it's hot, it's invigorating and it's nothing like anything you've seen before from this part of the world.

The pioneers of Asakaa are fondly referred to by the genre's patrons as the Kumerica boys, a set of budding young rappers based in the city of Kumasi in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. They came into the limelight towards the end of 2020, and have been dropping banger after banger since then, topping several charts and racking up millions of views collectively. The rap is charismatic, the visuals are captivating, and their swag is urban. Characterized by Twi lyrics, infectious hooks, and sinister beats, the allure and appeal of both their art and their culture is overflowing.

"Sore," one of the benchmark songs of the movement, is a monster hit that exploded into the limelight, earning Kumerican rapper Yaw Tog a feature on Billboard Italy and a recent remix that featured Stormzy. "Ekorso" by Kofi Jamar is the song that took over Ghana's December 2020, with the video currently sitting at 1.3 million views on YouTube. "Off White Flow" is the song that earned rapper Kwaku DMC and his peers a feature on Virgil Abloh's Apple Music show Televised Radio. These are just a few examples of the numerous accolades that the songs birthed from the Asakaa movement have earned. Ghana's drill scene is the new cool, but it isn't just a trend. It's an entire movement, and it's here to stay.

Want to get familiar? Here we highlight the most prominent songs of the Asakaa movement that you need to know. Here's our rundown of Ghana's drill songs that are making waves right now. Check them out below.

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Listen to Berri's Infectious Afropop Single 'Fire'

The emerging singer makes a confident debut.

Emerging singer and Big Brother Records artist Berri, real name Agada Blessed, kickstarts his foray into the Nigerian music space with his debut single "Fire."

Produced by Dir. X, the mid-tempo tune sees Berri make a bold statement that he's here to stay, and that nobody can kill the "Fire" within him to make great music. Berri poured his whole heart out on this inaugural track, connecting and creating dope musical chemistry with the producer.

At just 16-years-old, Berri's debut comes at a time when young artists in Nigeria are becoming a great force to reckon with. As he joins that league, the multi-talented singer has started on a great note with "Fire." He sings "oil dey my head" over the mid-tempo pop beat, a bold declaration of his unwavering belief in himself.

Stream "Fire," available for streaming and download on all digital stores worldwide.

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Cedric Nzaka Debuts Photographic Coffee Table Book

Kenyan photographer, Cedric Nzaka, has announced that his coffee table book 'Everyday People Stories' will be released this March.