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Video: Nas Speaks On Concert Promoter Kidnapping In Angola

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You might remember when we wrote about an American concert promoter and his son are being held hostage due to Nas‘ failure to appear at a heavily promoted New Year’s Eve concert in Luanda, Angola. Basically, a local promoter wired around $300K to Nas’ camp, but the rapper never even made it on a plane citing “miscommunication”. The middleman American promoter and his son were then allegedly kidnapped at gunpoint and were held until Nas returned all the $300,000.

Nas denies any wrongdoing stating, "basically he was a promoter that I never worked with, and he wanted me to come to Africa for New Year's, which, for me, I thought, would be the best way to spend New Year's. The business wasn't handled. There was nothing sent to me, and there were no flights. By the time he did send money — he did eventually send money to me — but it was too late to go. I didn't even have a visa to get in the country. So that's canceled, the show's canceled."

Nas claims innocence. The promoter claims all plans were set and is looking to sue Nas for "not showing up and put[ting him and his son] at physical harm and at risk by his inaction to fly to Angola." Who you believe.

(via)

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Emile YX? Wants to 'Reconnect The String'

The father of South African hip-hop's latest book release is here to teach you about the culture.

As a father-figure in South African hip-hop, there's a lot Emile Lester Jansen, aka Emile YX?, knows. He'll also tell you, there's a lot he doesn't. But the knowledge Emile has gained, over his 3 decades in music, he's always tried to share with others. His latest project is no different. The Black Noise founder is working on a book that identifies the similarities between Bushmen expression and hip-hop, and how this knowledge can help empower anyone who has a love of the culture.

The book, which will be called Reconnect The String, comes on the back of this year's 21st anniversary of the African Hip Hop Indaba, one of the landmark hip hop events in Cape Town created by Emile, which has helped many an artist launch their career. As a teacher and a musician, he's long been involved in using hip hop to uplift communities—first through the seminal group Black Noise, founded in the late 1980s, with its rhymes rallying against Apartheid, and then through the Heal the Hood organization, a non-profit that grew out of the group's efforts to use its love of hip hop to fuel youth development initiatives in townships on the Cape Flats.

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