Video

Video: The Lo Frequency Visit World Summit of African Descendants in Honduras

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Brooklyn based hip-hop collective The Lo Frequency (Chen Lo & The Liberation Family) have circled the globe visiting places like Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Lebanon, Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco in promotion of hip-hop culture. At their destinations the crew organize community workshops, live performances, and collaborate with local musicians on tunes and videos.

Recently, The Lo Frequency crew traveled to La Ceiba, Honduras for the first annual World Summit of African Descendants, a "commemoration of the International Year for People of African Descent proclaimed by the United Nations [in which] delegates from all over the world gathered to discuss the socioeconomic conditions of Afro-descendant populations and establish a plan to ensure development with equity" for the group. (TLF)

Check out clips of TLF crew at the summit's opening ceremony and getting percussion lessons from locals kids above and below. Head over to The Lo Frequency for more of their music and stay tuned for the upcoming debut EP The Export.

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Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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