Audio

D.C.'s Elikeh Drop New Afropop Album, 'Adje! Adje!'

Hear a taste of D.C. band Elikeh's sophomore album, 'Adje! Adje!'

Coming from the cultural melting pot of Washington D.C. and led by Togolese singer/guitarist Massama Dogo, Elikeh is downright dirty. Their recently-released sophomore album, Adje! Adje!, features afropop with politically-driven lyrics, blaring horns, super funky guitars and a brilliant rhythm section. While Dogo provides a flawless Afropop “foundation” to the album, former Femi Kuti drummer Tosin Aribisala and the distorted shredding of guitarist John Lee take the music to another level. Watch the above video for a taste of Elikeh's live show. Head to their website for the full album.


Listen to a track off the album here: "Oleblemi" by Elikeh

Audio
Femi Kuti. Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100

Femi Kuti & Stromae Appear On a New Coldplay Song 'Arabesque'

The Nigerian afrobeat legend and Belgian-Rwandan pop star will feature on Coldplay's new album, Everyday Life.

In a sentence we never thought we'd type, both Femi Kuti and Stromae appear on a new song from Coldplay.

Both the Nigerian legend and Belgian pop star are featured on "Arabesque," a newly released Coldplay track from their upcoming "more experimental" album Everyday Life (due November 22 via Parlophone/Atlantic), which was shared by the band alongside the main single "Orphans."

"Arabesque" is an expansive composition built on what sounds like North African-inspired guitars and rhythms, which call to mind the likes of Bombino and Tinariwen. The song sees Stromae delivering a verse in French.

Femi Kuti comes in around the 2-minute mark for a solid and extensive saxophone solo. The song also notably features a sample of Fela Kuti's famous quote "music is the weapon of the future."

Coldplay's Everyday Life is being promoted as a double album, which is split into two halves, Sunrise and Sunset. "Arabesque" is from the Sunrise portion of the album, while "Orphans" is from Sunset.

Listen to both "Arabesque" and "Orphans" below.

Keep reading... Show less
popular

This Is What Afro Nation Festival Looked Like

The first edition of the urban beach festival—featuring Burna Boy, Wizkid, Davido, and many more—looked incredible.

Afro Nation had its very first edition over the weekend in the Algarve region of Portugal.

The newly-launched gathering brought together top talent from across Nigeria, Ghana, Tanzania, Jamaica, the U.K. and the U.S. for a 4-day long "urban beach festival."

Over its several days and nights, Afro Nation brought together afrobeats' rising stars with cemented legends for an impressive line-up.

The debut edition of Afro Nation boasted performances form the likes of Burna Boy, Davido, Wizkid, J Hus, D'Banj, Busy Signal, Buju Banton, Femi Kuti, Tiwa Savage, Adekunle Gold, Jidenna, Maleek Berry, Stonebwoy, Vanessa Mdee, and many more.

If you missed the action we've got some of the best moments and pictures from the debut Afro Nation festival below.

Afro Nation will be hosting a festival in Lagoma Beach in Accra, Ghana in December 27-30. Get more info on Afro Nation Ghana here.

See some highlights from the first ever Afro Nation festival below.

Keep reading... Show less
popular

14 Cultural Events You Can't Miss this December in South Africa

OkayAfrica's guide to must-see events during South Africa's festive season.

South Africans will tell you that December is not just a month, it's an entire lifestyle. From beginning to end, it's about being immersed in a ton of activity with friends and family as well as any new folk you meet along the way. Whether you're looking to turn up to some good music or watch some provocative theater, our guide to just 14 cultural events happening in South Africa this December, has something for everyone.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.