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Watch Iman Speak on Her Youth as a Somalian Refugee For Kenzo + H&M's Upcoming Collab

“I am the face of a refugee,” the 61-year-old model-icon says.

Iman epitomizes the adage, “Black don’t crack.”


And the 61-year-old model-icon continues to glow as the lead campaign for Kenzo and H&M’s collaboration arriving in stores Nov. 3.

Ahead of the full campaign photographed by Jean-Paul Goude that also features Chance the Rapper, actress Rosario Dawson, Vietnam’s “Queen of Rap” Suboi, and others decked out in coveted dynamic prints from the collection—rolling out on Oct. 17—Iman opens up about her Somalian background as an ambassador’s daughter, and how her life changed dramatically overnight.

Iman for H&M

“We left Somalia on foot, literally, from Somalia to Kenya and the Kenyan government took us in as refugees. So, I have never forgotten the non-government organizations that really helped me when I was a teenager," she reveals. "I just wanted people, really, to understand, when they think about refugees, cause, you know, I am the face of a refugee.”

The founder of Iman cosmetics and wife of late music legend David Bowie mentions that she may have had a career in politics instead of modeling and entrepreneurship, until she realized that being a private citizen has its benefits.

“I wanted to major in political science,” she says wearing a multicolored, off-the-shoulder design from the forthcoming Kenzo and H&M collection. “I wanted to become part of the politics of in Somalia, but boy am I glad that I didn’t because I really feel if you are within a government, obviously you don’t have your own voice. But as citizen, I find that I have more freedom to speak about anything I feel passionately about.”

You can watch the ever-graceful Iman speak firsthand about her experience below:

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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