Film
Photo still via YouTube.

'One Day Go Be One Day' Is an Experiential Look Beyond the Fela Kuti We Know

Directed by Akinola Davies Jr, this short film gives Fela's family the room to tell his complex truth.

This short film brought to you by Dazed, NTS and Carhartt WIP is a much-needed chronicling of Fela Kuti beyond the surfaced superstardom the world has imposed on him.

Directed by Akinola Davies Jr, One Day Go Be One Day fuses the voices of his sons Femi and Seun Kuti, his album cover artist Lemi Ghariokwu, spoken word and music by Nigerian musician Obongjayar and artistic reenaactments to expound on his life between 1977 and 1981, as well as how the death of Fela's mother—Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti—impacted his life.

"The death of his mum too really broke him," Ghariokwu says in the film.


Shot in Lagos as well as in Osogbo and Badagry—towns pertinent to his life and legacy—the film oozes with Fela's spirit.

"In speaking to Fela's closest confidants, we unearthed a side to the musician which was more vulnerable, as the claustrophobia of his fame and the rumours that surround it are still felt even now by those left behind," Kemi Alemoru says, describing what it was like making the film. "The longer you follow Fela's path, the more it feels like the madness and mysticism of him is all around. As the words of Obongjayar punctuate the film: 'Corruption, betrayal… he who is free, mortality cannot constrain.' In so many ways, the spirit of Fela lives on."

Watch One Day Go Be One Day below.

One Day Go Be One Day youtu.be

ICYMI, join OkayAfrica at Okay Space in Williamsburg to catch the New York premiere of the film in conjunction with the Fela Kuti x Carhartt WIP pop-up Thursday. Click here for more info.

Interview

A Candid Conversation With Olamide & Fireboy DML

We talk to the Nigerian stars about the hardest lessons they've learned, best advice they've ever been given and what Nigeria means to them.

Olamide and Fireboy DML have been working together for three years, but the first time they sit down to do an interview together is hours after they arrive in New York City on a promo tour.

It's Fireboy's first time in the Big Apple — and in the US — and the rain that's pouring outside his hotel doesn't hinder his gratitude. "It's such a relief to be here, it's long overdue," he tells OkayAfrica. "I was supposed to be here last year, but Covid stopped that. This is a time to reflect and refresh. It's a reset button for me."

Olamide looks on, smiling assuredly. Since signing Fireboy to his YBNL Nation label in 2018, he's watched the soulful young singer rise to become one of Nigeria's most talked-about artists — from his breakout single, "Jealous," to his debut album Laughter, Tears & Goosebumps, hit collabs with D.Smoke and Cuppy, and his sophomore release, Apollo, last year.

Even while he shares his own latest record, UY Scuti, with the world, Olamide nurtures Fireboy's career with as much care and attention as he does his own, oscillating between his two roles of artist and label exec seamlessly. His 2020 album Carpe Diem is the most streamed album ever by an African rap artist, according to Audiomack, hitting over 140 million streams. When Olamide signed a joint venture with US-based record label and distribution company, Empire, in February last year he did so through his label, bringing Fireboy and any other artist he decides to sign along for the ride, and establishing one of the most noteworthy deals on the continent.

Below, Olamide & Fireboy DML speak to OkayAfrica about their mutual admiration for each other, what makes them get up in the morning and how they switch off.

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