News Brief

This Emotional Film Showing a Glimpse of Lisbon's Afro-Portuguese Music Scene Is a Must-See

'Pai Nosso' is a stunning short doc about young people caught in the diasporan drift between Angola and Portugal.

Pai Nosso, a short film directed by Clayton Vomero, introduces us to 23-year-old DJ Firmeza—a Lisbon-based Angolan producer and DJ whose family emigrated to Portugal in the 90s.

DJ Firmeza, whose real name is Cilio Manuel, discerns grief and faith as the film follows him around Quinto Do Mocho, a notoriously rough neighborhood on the outskirts of Lisbon.

Although the community is improving, the young people are caught up in Portugal's alarming youth unemployment crisis—DJ Firmeza is an example of how music can be a way out, as his work reaches millions of listeners on the internet.

"Firmeza represents a growing generation of youth left on their own to decide their place in the world," Vomero says in a statement. "The memory of his father, the musical talent that speaks for itself, and the neighborhood that is his home are integral parts of the film and the 23-year-old man that is Firmeza. I think this concept of self is something that speaks to many people now. We have our memories, our self-worth, and our friends, and not much else."

The film provides an emotional and personal look into the artist's life, where he talks about the recent passing of his father, his struggles with mortality, and his belief and faith in God and himself, and his hope for his future.

"One day I wish that I could show him that we are here," Firmeza says of his father in the film. "That we've become someone like he wished so many times. You see, they emigrated for us. I wish he could know I'm doing the right thing in return."

Watch Pai Nosso, produced in collaboration with The FADER, below.

(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

Keep reading... Show less
Photo by Monirul Bhuiyan via GettyImages

Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

Former Botswana President Ian Khama has condemned Zimbabwe's government and joined solidarity with #ZimbabweanLivesMatter.

Former President of Botswana, Ian Khama, has condemned Zimabwe's Zanu PF-led regime in a voice recording broadcasted by eNCA. Khama, known for being outspoken, has critiqued Zimbabwe's violent treatment of journalists and civilians. He voiced out concerns about alleged recent human rights violations which Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa continues to deny. The voice recording follows after southern African states' representatives hosted a webinar to critically discuss political affairs in the region.

Keep reading... Show less

J Molley Enlists Costa Titch and Yanga Chief in New Single 'Ang'na Stress' From Upcoming Mixtape

Listen to J Molley's new single 'Ang'na Stress' featuring Costa Titch and Yanga Chief.

In his new single, J Molley expands his scope as he collaborates with artists one wouldn't have predicted. Yanga Chief and Costa Titch spread their sauce on "Ang'na Stress", rapping and singing mostly in South African indigenous languages IsiZulu and IsiXhosa alongside J Molley's English raps.

"Ang'na Stress" is catchy and has mass appeal, it should get decent spins on radio. The song will appear on J Molley's upcoming mixtape All Is Fair In Love & War. The project is the hip-hop artist's first mixtape, and will be a follow-up to his EPs, Dreams Money Can Buy (2017) and Leader of the Wave, a Playlist by J Molley (2018).

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Somali President Replaces Former Prime Minister Ahead of Elections

President Mohamed Abduallahi Mohamed has announced Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble as Somalia's new prime minister ahead of upcoming elections.