Film
Still from Scenes from a Dry City.

Watch this Evocative South African Documentary 'Scenes from a Dry City'

The 12-minute short film highlights the water crisis in the city of Cape Town.

The racial divide between those living in the poor township of Khayelitsha to the affluent beach-side suburb of Clifton is growing wider. Stringent water restrictions on those who've always had water have almost leveled the playing field with those who've always lacked it. A persistent drought, dangerously low dam levels and the ever-present threat of taps running completely dry, are just some of the poignant scenes depicted in Scenes of a Dry City.


Veteran South African documentary filmmakers Francois Verster and Simon Wood teamed up with Academy Award-winning producer Laura Poitras to create a deeply moving and reflective piece of protest cinema.

Cape Town has been struggling with dwindling water sources for years now. Insufficient rains, near-empty dam levels and the looming 'Day Zero' are the daily realities of its residents. What is interesting, however, is how the crisis and subsequent attempts to privatize water have affected its residents differently.

Still from Scenes from a Dry City

Scenes from a Dry City explores the Cape Town water crisis from different societal perspectives. From illegal car washers, religious groups in protest of water privatization to golfers on lush green courses who are completely oblivious to the water crisis as a whole.

In their press release, Verster and Wood say:

"There had been a slate of journalistic films about the impact of the water crisis in Cape Town. We wanted to make a film that attempted instead, perhaps in a very tenuous way, to inhabit the perspective of water itself, its ultimate indifference to what is happening in the city, and thereby to try assess some of the deeper existential dimensions involved in the debate."

Still from Scenes from a Dry City

The documentary has been described by the International Documentary Film Festival as "a film that is as visually stunning as it is urgent".

Watch the documentary below:


News Brief
Photo by Oupa Bopape/Gallo Images via Getty Images

South Africa Shocked After DJ Sumbody's Fatal Shooting

The popular Amapiano pioneer, DJ Sumbody, was tragically killed in Johannesburg.


News recently broke that the well known South African Amapiano music producer Oupa John Sefoka, popularly known as DJ Sumbody passed awaythis past Sunday, November 20th.

The family reported that specific details of DJ Sumbody's passing could not be released because the issue was a part of a larger, ongoing investigation.

"Artist and musician DJ Sumbody has died. Details of his untimely death cannot be released but the artist allegedly ran into an unfortunate incident that led to his passing in the early hours of Sunday morning, November 20 2022," the family released in a statement, according to News24.

According to several unconfirmed reports, the renowned South African DJ was traveling on Woodmead road in Johannesburg when gunmen attacked his vehicle with a hail of bullets, which instantly killed him and one of his bodyguards.

He was en route to perform at an event in Woodmead for the All White Veuve Clicquot Picnic on Sunday. Apart from being an Amapiano pioneer, DJ Sumbody was a creative force in the South African entertainment industry. In the early hours of Sunday, Sumsounds Music, his management team, confirmed the news.

DJ Sumbody was a pioneer of the well-known viral Amapiano sound, a word that translates to "the pianos" in Zulu and is an eclectic genre that started in South Africa in 2012 and fuses house, jazz and lounge music for a unique sonic experience.

During the pandermic, OkayAfrica featured him in the pieceDJ Sumbody Is Ensuring Amapiano Stays Alive During Times of Coronavirus and Social Distancing.

Social media users went online to share their shock about the unfortunate event.

Music

Listen to Sho Madjozi's New Single 'Toro' Featuring DDG

The talented South African rapper Sho Madjozi comes through with a confident new track.

South African rap star Sho Madjozi just shared her latest single, "Toro," featuring DDG via Epic Records.

The critically acclaimed artist first burst into the music scene in 2017 and became an act to watch because of her unique flow, and her keen eye for vibrant fashion styles that fused traditional African attires with modern spins.

"Toro" is the rapper's first English release since "John Cena," a record that quickly became a viral sensation after its release. Over the years, the rapper has continued to push the envelope and sonically break barriers by experimenting with her flow, cadence, and structure. On this record, fellow Epic Records signee DDGalso makes an appearance, and the two ride the wave of the beat in a memorable way.

The song has a noticeable Amapiano beat, a genre increasingly gaining traction on the modern African music scene. While talking about the song, Sho Madjozi shared that it speaks to the complexity of human relationships and how the bad endings of relationships, both platonic and romantic, can be an eye-opening experience.

" 'Toro' is short for 'Mtoroki,' meaning an 'escaper.' I've escaped bad managers, bad lovers and still come out as me," Sho Madjozi mentions. "I even defy convention because I say and do what I like. However, this music video is part 1 of this story. The thing around my neck stands for my gift—the thing that has given me my success. The video makes a statement about how isolating fame can be: how friends, managers, etc., have backstabbed me. By the end of this video, I'm disillusioned with fame and wishing I didn't have this gift at all because it's made me lose touch with closest to me and probably even myself."

So far, Sho Madjozi has received a lot of critical acclaim, awards, and recognition, including "Favorite African Star" at the Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards, "Best New International Artist" at the BET Awards, "Entertainer of the Year" from Forbes, and more.

The music video for "Toro," also released earlier today, chronicles a dance party that initially starts with people having a good time until chaos breaks out. Watch the clip below.

Sports

All You Need to Know About the African Teams at the World Cup

We break down how Senegal, Ghana, Cameroon, Morocco, and Tunisia's national teams are looking ahead of the Qatar World Cup 2022.

African football has come a long way.

Egypt was the first African team to ever participate in a FIFA World Cup. They did it in Italy in 1934, where they only played a game, which they lost 4-2 to Hungary. Back then, the Confederation of African Football (CAF) didn’t exist, so the Pharaohs played two qualifier games against British Palestine.

CAF was eventually formed in 1956, but the World Cup would only see another African team in Mexico 1970, when Morocco qualified. Years later, Pelé, the legendary Brazilian player, predicted that an African team would win a World Cup before the year 2000, he was mocked mercilessly. For many, it was not an unlikely outcome, it was an absurd proposition.

And yet, African footballers have become more and more often part of the footballing elite, playing in the best leagues, and becoming some of the most famous players. While, still, only European and South American teams have won World Cups.

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Interview

Seni Saraki On Co-Producing the Nigerian Side of the 'Black Panther' Soundtrack

We speak with NATIVE's Seni Saraki who helped put together the Lagos arm of Black Panther: Wakanda Forever - Music From and Inspired By.

Back in July when Marvel released its Black Panther: Wakanda Forever Prologue EP, led by Tems’ soul-stirring cover of Bob Marley’s “No Woman, No Cry,” the consensus among young, internet-savvy Africans was that the follow-up to 2018’s record-breaking Black Panther was shaping up to be seminal moment for African culture after years of gestation and ascending visibility in the western world.

The arrival of the full soundtrack has proved that the optimism felt at that time was not unfounded. In a sharp contrast to the Kendrick Lamar-curated soundtrack for the first film, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever - Music From and Inspired By is a full-on deep-dive into the pulse of African and Mexican popular music as we know it. Taking influences from these sources makes sense as the movie is primarily inspired by both Nigerian and Meso-american cultures and we get to see acts like Burna Boy, Fireboy DML, DBN Gogo, and CKay line-up on the musical accompaniment to one of the eagerly-anticipated releases of the year.

To get some perspective on how the African arm of the soundtrack came together, we spoke to The NATIVE’s editor-in-chief, Seni Saraki, who served as the soundtrack album co-producer for the Lagos arm of production, touching on his involvement with the project, its reception, and what he hopes its legacy might be.

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