Audio

Wizkid and Drake's New Collaboration, "Hush Up The Silence," Leaks

Download Wizkid and Drake's new joint single "Hush Up the Silence," which leaked online.

As if it wasn't going to happen, after the stupendous success of “One Dance,” Wizkid and Drake’s new song surfaced as a leak on Saturday evening.


The new collaboration was tagged online as “Hush Up the Silence” and appeared on neither artist’s social media pages, neither on Twitter, Instagram nor SoundCloud.

It may have been labelled as “Hush Up the Silence” but a sensible title is “Come Closer,” seeing that the entirety of the chorus is “yeah baby, come closer” sung twice.

The song is yet another in Drake’s excursions into dancehall beginning with his guest verse on Rihanna’s 2010 single “What's My Name?” where he broke his straight-rap to do a bit of singing, no different from what many rappers would do.

Less than six years later, he's able to confidently modulate his singing with a faux-Caribbean lilt as he did on “Work” off Rihanna’s Anti, as well as on three songs off the brilliantly baggy Views, namely: “Controlla,” “Too Good” with Rihanna again and “One Dance” with Kyla and Wizkid.

It is this rich vein of form that he takes into this new song with Wizkid who, for his part, has had a stellar year that included a Grammy nomination and Artist of the Year at the Headies, amongst many.

“Hush Up The Silence/Come Closer” is more likely a Wizkid song and a favour returned from Drake on account of Wizkid opening the first verse and chorus while Drake comes in last.

Both artists mesh so well here, a significant improvement on the runaway success that was “Ojuelegba” which also featured Skepta.

Come summer time, this will be a certified BANGER.

Listen to and download Wizkid and Drake's "Hush Up The Silence" here.

 

Interview

Interview: The Awakening of Bas

We talk to Bas about The Messenger, Bobi Wine, Sudan, and the globalized body of Black pain.

The first thing you notice when you begin to listen to The Messenger—the new investigative documentary podcast following the rise of Ugandan singer, businessman and revolutionary political figure Bobi Wine—is Bas' rich, paced, and deeply-affecting storytelling voice.

Whether he is talking about Uganda's political landscape, painting a picture of Bobi Wine's childhood, or drawing parallels between the violence Black bodies face in America and the structural oppression Africans on the continent continue to endure at the hands of corrupt government administrations, there is no doubt that Bas (real name Abbas Hamad) has an intimate understanding of what he's talking about.

We speak via Zoom, myself in Lagos, and him in his home studio in Los Angeles where he spends most of his time writing as he cools off from recording the last episode of The Messenger. It's evident that the subject matter means a great deal to the 33-year-old Sudanese-American rapper, both as a Black man living in America and one with an African heritage he continues to maintain deep ties with. The conversation around Black bodies enduring various levels of violence is too urgent and present to ignore and this is why The Messenger is a timely and necessary cultural work.

Below, we talk with Bas aboutThe Messenger podcast, Black activism, growing up with parents who helped shape his political consciousness and the globalized body of Black pain.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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